Nevertheless his rhetorical question if not

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Nevertheless, his rhetorical question, “If not civilizations, what?” deserves an answer. Satisfying basic human needs on a global basis will require a powerful movement for social change—a movement waiting to be born. Notes 1 . Samuel P. Huntington, “The Clash of Civilizations?” , Foreign Affairs , 72:3 (Summer 1993): 21-49. 2 . Samuel P. Huntington, “If Not Civilizations, What? Paradigms of the Post-Cold War World,” Foreign Affairs , 72:5 (November-December, 1992); 190. 3 . John Burton, ed., Conflict: Basic Human Needs (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1990). The clash of civilizations? Huntington, Samuel P. Foreign Affairs . New York: Summer 1993.Vol.72, Iss. 3; pg. 22, 28 pgs. Abstract (Document Summary) World politics is entering a new phase in which the great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural. Civilizations, the highest cultural groupings of people, are differentiated from each other by religion, history, language, and tradition. These divisions are deep and increasing in importance. From Yugoslavia to the Middle East to Central Asia, the fault lines of civilizations are the battle lines of the future. In this emerging era of cultural conflict, the US must forge alliances with similar cultures and spread its values wherever possible. With alien civilizations, the West must be accommodating if possible, but confrontational if necessary. In the final analysis, however, all civilizations will have to learn to tolerate each other. Full Text (9613 words) Copyright Council on Foreign Relations Summer 1993 The Next Pattern Of Conflict Generated by ABC Amber LIT Converter, Page 31
World politics is entering a new phase, and intellectuals have not hesitated to proliferate visions of what it will be—the end of history, the return of traditional rivalries between nation states, and the decline of the nation state from the conflicting pulls of tribalism and globalism, among others. Each of these visions catches aspects of the emerging reality. Yet they all miss a crucial, indeed a central, aspect of what global politics is likely to be in the coming years. It is my hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in this new world will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. The great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural. Nation states will remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines of the future. Conflict between civilizations will be the latest phase in the evolution of conflict in the modern world. For a century and a half after the emergence of the modern international system with the Peace of Westphalia, the conflicts of the Western world were largely among princes—emperors, absolute monarchs and

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