1798 john adams worried about tension 6 1800

This preview shows page 6 - 8 out of 14 pages.

1798; John Adams worried about tension 6. 1800; elections 7. 1802; pretty much has stayed the same sheet a. Since 1802 - green card holder (lawful permanent resident - LPR)...once you are here for 5 years, married to a citizen spouse, time cuts to 3 years) b. Once you are naturalized you can be denaturalized (especially people from war crimes like Nazis) c. When war criminals go through the process to be denaturalized, they lose their citizenship because they lied not because they committed atrocities d. You can denaturalize yourself and become an ex patriot...some people did this during the Vietnam war and this still happens today e. N400 form has been very discriminatory i.1990 - Administrativeness occurred to Naturalization process 8. Laws have excluded people solely because of race a. Haney Lopez - American values about who belongs and does not 9. 1790-1870 - only whites could naturalize...14th amendment...civil rights 10. 1870-1952 - Whites and blacks could naturalize … asians couldn’t naturalize 11. During WWII, US and Nazi Germany were only 2 countries that had such strict laws xv.Time periods (more specific) 1. 1820-1880 - Old Immigrants a. over 10 million b. 80-90% from British Isles and Northern Europe 2. 1840s - Irish and Germans a. Catholics, peasants (millions) 3. 1880s-1920: Eastern/Central + Southern Europe a. 23 million 4. 1920-1950 - DRAMATIC DROP a. 5.5 million a6
Image of page 6

Subscribe to view the full document.

5. 1950-1980s - - post 1965; Asian and Latin Americans a. about 10 million 6. Post 1980 - emergence of UDE (undocumented entry) issue (LA, Asia, also Africa, India, Phillipines) xvi.NATIVISM = DEEPLY EMBEDDED IN AMERICAN CULTURE xvii.Open Borders 1. A settler society, nation of immigrants 2. Needed immigration to fill the vast territory 3. US Constitution; 1787 (vague on immigration) a. Article I, Section 8; Congress shall establish a uniform rule for naturalization b. Article I, Section 9; immigration through importation of slaves until 1808 4. John Tyler (1941 or 1841?) message to Congress: a. “We hold out to the people in other countries an invitation to come and settle among us as members of our rapidly growing family” 5. Abraham Lincoln (1862) encourages immigration in speech to Congress a. reasons; economics + demographics xviii.Antecedents; Federal Immigration Control 1. Naturalization Laws by Congress (1790) a. Restricted naturalization to “free white persons” intention to bar citizenship to blacks and indentured servants xix.Enemies Act 1798 1. Alien & Sedition Act a. Alien Act: gave President power to deport any noncitizen deemed dangerous without judicial review (never enforced) b. Sedition Act: made it a crime for anyone to criticize government officials (enforced only agains Dem-Reps between 1798-1800 → TJ pardoned all and At’s allowed to expire) … victory for freedom +right to criticize 2. Enemy Alien Act (1798 -- still in place today) a. FIRST EXAMPLE OF LEGIT XENOPHOBIA... EXCLUDED PEOPLE BC THEY WERE FROM OTHER COUNTRIES/DIDN’T WANT TO GET INVOLVED...PUSHED TO 14 YEARS (AMOUNT YOU HAD TO STAY IN THE us TO BE A CITIZEN Authorizes president during declared war to “detain, expel, or otherwise reflect the freedom of any citizen of the country with which we are at war” b.
Image of page 7
Image of page 8
You've reached the end of this preview.
  • Fall '12
  • Koulish
  • Immigration to the United States, United States Congress, United States nationality law, History of immigration to the United States, United States federal immigration and nationality legislation

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern