Reference Choosing effective patient education materials MedlinePlus Medical

Reference choosing effective patient education

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Choosing effective patient education materials: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. (2014, February 4). Retrieved October 17, 2015. How to Write Learning Objectives that Meet Demanding Behavioral Criteria. (2015, May 25). Retrieved October 17, 2015. Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 16, 2015 10:16 PM 0 Like Substantive Post John Sebastian 2 posts Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 2 I can kind of understand your essay example, but I don't think I can agree that essays are a good measure for educational objectives. While essays and other graded assignments are important in academics to assess their understanding of the material, the rubric has a very defined criteria. Kizlik (2015) states, "Usually, criteria are expressed in some minimum number, or as what must be, as a minimum, included in a student response" (para. 1, "3. The Criteria"). With rubrics there are specific things that the teacher is looking for and the minimum isn't truly something the student should strive for. I suppose the objective could be improving essay writing, but the minimum would still be too detrimental for a student's GPA. What else could the learning objective apply to? References Kizlik, B. (2015, May 25). How to write learning objectives that meet demanding behavioral criteria. Retrieved from Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 16, 2015 10:31 PM 0 Like Substantive Post Florence Mercado-Garcia 3 posts Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 2 Oscar, It makes sense to me that personalized teaching tailored specifically for the patient would be most effective. I had an experience where a client had received a new diagnosis that was particularly difficult. The client had been making poor life choices prior to the diagnosis, and was in danger of continuing the high-risk behavior. This person was very emotionally upset and very combative verbally with the staff. I had a heart-to-heart conversation where I allowed the client to explore the various feelings involved to overcome the emotional barrier creating a teachable environment. I then used positive sentences with action verbs to lay clear path. I
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was also very honest and suggested that if life-style changes did not occur, this new diagnosis could take over. In addition, I gave tools to be used when anxiety and emotional breakdown happened, not only so that the client would feel in more control, but so the staff would not be alienated as well. I hope I made a positive impact for this person by using teaching skills. Have you experienced any emotionally charged teaching moments? How did you handle them? Flossie Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 16, 2015 10:45 PM 0 Like Substantive Post Florence Mercado-Garcia 3 posts Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 2 Gretchen, I am not surprised with the statistic you quoted regarding patient health literacy being 12% here in the United States. In my experience, many patients have misconceptions about their medical conditions, even after many years with that condition. At my facility, the nurses regularly give patient education to combat this issue. When I have a patient with a new medication, I usually print literature associated with the new medication and/or diagnosis. I provide teaching using
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