Some goals in the indonesian development of coconut

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Some goals in the Indonesian development of coconut are: to improve copra productivity from 1.1 t/ha/year to 3.0 t/ha/year (or from 40 to 120 nuts/palm/year) to use more of the coconut raw materials through sharing between the coconut processing industries, and thus maximise the farmers’ incomes • to adopt cheaper, efficient, effective and more environmentally friendly coconut processing technologies in order to sustain or improve the production of highly competitive coconut products • to develop collaboration between researchers, technicians and management to accelerate the adoption of new technologies and products from coconut. Technology innovation to solve some problems in the development of coconut as a modern commodity is a key factor in analysing the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the industry. As a research institute, ICOPRI must generate innovation that is commercially and scientifically sound. Coconut genetic resources Genetic diversity of germplasm is very important to the Indonesian coconut breeding program. The exploration of Indonesian coconut germplasm started in 1927 and continues today; so far, 131 accessions have been collected and conserved. However, only a part of this collection has been used for breeding and other research purposes. Initial exploration and collection of coconut genetic resources Research on coconut palms was given considerable attention during the Dutch colonial period. Formal research was institutionally started in 1911, involving the collecting of coconut populations from Java. From 1926 to 1927 Dr Tammes identified and selected 100 high-yielding Tall palms from the populations of coconut growing in the Mapanget District of North Sulawesi, and planted them in the Experimental Garden of ICOPRI. From 1956 to 1961 the Govern- ment of Indonesia contracted the services of a German FAO expert to characterise, select and cross the coconut germplasm previously collected by Dr Ihne, with the aim of producing high-yielding hybrids. In the 1990s the International Coconut Genetic Resources Network (COGENT) of the International Plant Genetic Resources Institute (IPGRI) identified the problem of genetic erosion through germplasm loss. In an attempt to prevent this in Indonesia, coconut germplasm was collected and conserved in field gene banks. This work was funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and implemented from 1996 to 1997. Coconut populations were specifically collected from East Nusa Tenggara and Moluccas Province and conserved at the International Coconut Genebank for the South-East and East Asian region (ICG-SEA) located at Sikijang, Riau, Indonesia. Further exploration, collecting and evaluation of coconut germplasm Further exploration, collecting and evaluation of coconut germplasm took place with the help of 20 COGENT member countries and using ADB funding in a project entitled ‘Coconut genetic resources network and human resources strengthening in Asia and the Pacific region’. The project collecting activ-
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