not use adjuncts but must instead hire teaching faculty with minimally good jobs many would just stop using adjuncts altogether This observation

Not use adjuncts but must instead hire teaching

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improve the plight of adjuncts costs money. This money has to come from somewhere. It has an opportunity cost: any money spent helping adjuncts is money not being spent doing something else of value. Thus, no analysis of what universities owe adjuncts is complete unless it identifies the opportunity costs associated with helping adjuncts. The argument cannot simply be that adjuncts should get more money, but instead that adjuncts should get the money rather than someone or something else. In The Fall of the Faculty, political scientist Benjamin Ginsberg argues that universities have severely misallocated resources (Ginsberg 2013). Ginsberg claims that universities now suffer from severe administrative bloat. In the past 40 years, U.S. higher education has expanded the number of administrators and non-teaching staff by 300 % or more, far out-pacing the growth in the number of students or faculty (Ginsberg 2013, p. 39). Ginsberg argues at great length that the proliferation of deans, deanlets, associate deans, assistant deans, assistants to the assistant deans, directors, and the like is pernicious. These expanding positions drive up the costs of J. Brennan, P. Magness 123 college, but most of these new administrators, he argues, have a negative net value. Suppose for the sake of argument that Ginsberg is right. Or,suppose for the sake of argument that universities are misallocating their funds in other ways, perhaps by funding costly sports teams, unnecessary climbing walls, or unneeded or overly fancy buildings. One might then conclude that universities could easily absorb a $15–50 billion or greater increase in teaching costs by reallocating money away from administrators or football programs. Since education and research are the two core missions of the university, this seems like an obvious
trade-off. Indeed, it seems disturbing that most university funds do not go toward either teaching or research. Perhaps it is wildly optimistic to believe universities will reallocate money toward

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