For example unlike moods emotions tend to be more

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Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 1
Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity
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differences are subtler. For example, unlike moods, emotions tend to be more clearly revealed with facial expressions (anger, disgust). Also, some researchers speculate that emotions may be more action-oriented—they may lead us to some immediate action—while moods may be more cognitive, meaning they may cause us to think or brood for a while. 10 Finally, the exhibit shows that emotions and moods can mutually influence each other. For example, an emotion, if it’s strong and deep enough, can turn into a mood: Getting your dream job may generate the emotion of joy, but it also can put you in a good mood for several days. Similarly, if you’re in a good or bad mood, it might make you experience a more intense positive or negative emotion than would otherwise be the case. For example, if you’re in a bad mood, you might “blow up” in response to a coworker’s comment when nor- mally it would have just generated a mild reaction. Because emotions and moods can mutually influence each other, there will be many points throughout the chapter where emotions and moods will be closely connected. Although affect, emotions, and moods are separable in theory, in practice the distinction isn’t always crystal clear. In fact, in some areas, researchers have studied mostly moods, and in other areas, mainly emotions. So, when we review the OB topics on emotions and moods, you may see more information on emo- tions in one area and moods in another. This is simply the state of the research. Also, the terminology can be confusing. For example, the two main mood dimensions are positive affect and negative affect, yet we have defined affect more broadly than mood. So, although the topic can be fairly dense in places, hang in there. The material is interesting—and applicable to OB. Emotions • Caused by specific event • Very brief in duration (seconds or minutes) • Specific and numerous in nature (many specific emotions such as anger, fear, sadness, happiness, disgust, surprise) • Usually accompanied by distinct facial expressions • Action-oriented in nature Moods • Cause is often general and unclear • Last longer than emotions (hours or days) • More general (two main dimensions— positive affect and negative affect— that are comprised of multiple specific emotions) • Generally not indicated by distinct expressions • Cognitive in nature Affect Defined as a broad range of feelings that people experience. Affect can be experienced in the form of emotions or moods. Exhibit 8-1 Affect,Emotions,and Moods affect A broad range of feelings that people experience. moods Feelings that tend to be less intense than emotions and that lack a contextual stimulus. emotions Intense feelings that are directed at someone or something.
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Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 1
Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity
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262 PART TWO The Individual A Basic Set of Emotions How many emotions are there? In what ways do they vary? There are dozens of emotions. They include anger, contempt, enthusiasm, envy, fear, frustration, disappointment, embarrassment, disgust, happiness, hate, hope, jealousy, joy, love, pride, surprise, and sadness. There have been numerous research efforts

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