in iron vitamins or minerals blood loss from surgery or an injury long term

In iron vitamins or minerals blood loss from surgery

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in iron, vitamins, or minerals; blood loss from surgery or an injury; long term illness such as diabetes, cancer, kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, HIV/AIDS, inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn's disease), liver disease, heart failure, and thyroid disease; long term infections; and a family history of inherited anemia such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. (NIH, 2012). Treatment of anemia is usually determined by the cause of the anemia. It is important to conduct a detailed patient history to help identify the underlying cause of the anemia. Most anemia is due to low levels of vitamins, iron, or minerals. Providing the patient with the replacement supplements such as iron, vitamin C to help with absorption of iron, vitamin B-12, and folic acid. Making dietary changes as well to include foods that provide a good source of these vitamins can help increase levels. Medications can be prescribed to help production of RBCs or to treat the underlying cause of the anemia. Some of these medications are antibiotics for infection, hormones to treat heavy menstrual bleeding, erythropoietin, and medicine to prevent the immune system from destroying its own RBCs (NIH, 2012). Most of these treatments for anemia do not have a negative effect on patients, especially women of childbearing age.
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References Arcangelo, V. P., & Peterson, A. M. (2013). Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice. Ambler, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute (NIH). (2012). What is anemia?. Retrieved from
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