Tmesipteris parva were conducted on king island by

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Tmesipteris parva were conducted on King Island by TSS personnel during 2007–2009 under the auspices of NRM-funded threatened flora verification projects (Wapstra et al. 2009). Tmesipteris parva is listed as a priority species requiring consideration in the development of the private land component of the Tasmanian reserve system (DPIWE 1998). Distribution and Habitat Tmesipteris parva occurs in Tasmania, Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland (Garrett 1996), and also reportedly from the Philippines (Duncan & Isaac 1986, Walsh & Entwisle 1994). Within Tasmania Tmesipteris parva has been recorded from Bob Smiths Gully on Flinders Island (Schahinger 2009), and two sites on King Island (Figure 7; Garrett 1996, Chinnock 1998). The linear extent of the three sites in Tasmania is 350 km, the extent of occurrence 2,800 km 2 (which includes large areas of sea) and the area of occupancy less than 1 ha. On King Island Tmesipteris parva grows within fern gullies on the trunks of Dicksonia antarctica (soft treefern). The underlying substrate geology is Precambrian sandstones/siltstones, and the altitude range is about 30 to 50 m above sea level. Populations All known subpopulations of Tmesipteris parva, and any new subpopulations found, are considered important for the survival of the species in Tasmania. There are thought to be only two extant subpopulations in Tasmania, one on Flinders Island and one on King Island (along a creek near Naracoopa) (Table 7). The status of the other recorded site on King Island (Grassy River) is uncertain — surveys in 2007 failed to locate the species and it is considered likely that it may be extinct as a consequence of long-term drought (Wapstra et al. 2009). Habitat critical to the survival of the species Habitat critical to the survival of Tmesipteris parva on King Island includes the two known sites and the creekline vegetation within their catchments. Table. 7. Population summary for Tmesipteris parva in Tasmania Subpopulati on Tenure NRM region 1:25000 mapshe et Year last (first) seen Area occupi ed (ha) Number of plants 1 Bob Smiths Gu lly Strzelecki National Park North Loccota 2008 (1990) 0.6 c. 1600 2 Naracoopa Private Cradle Coast Naracoo pa 2009 (1970?) 0.0000 01 10 (single host) 3 Grassy River Private Cradle Coast Grassy 1970? Unkno wn Possibly extinct King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 144
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Reservation Status Tmesipteris parva is reserved within Strzelecki National Park on Flinders Island. Threats and Management Threats to Tmesipteris parva on King Island include land clearing and associated impacts, inappropriate fire regimes, drying conditions associated with climate change, and stochastic events. Land clearing: The known Tmesipteris parva sites are both on private land, and are potentially at risk from the clearance of vegetation adjacent to the species’ creekline habitat, with resultant changes in hydrology, and damage to host plants by stock. All sites on private land have stock-proof fencing in place, so stock is considered a potential threat only. Clearance of vegetation is considered to be a very low potential threat, as most remaining vegetation is along deeply incised creeklines.
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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