The search for a cure for AIDS continues Learning more about the genetics of

The search for a cure for aids continues learning

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The search for a cure for AIDS continues. Learning more about the genetics of the small number of HIV­infected individuals who remain healthy may lead to new therapies that can help others. Gene therapy, in which the immune system is reconstructed with genetically altered resistant cells, is one potentially promising approach. Development of an effective and safe vaccine for HIV is the ultimate goal, but many biological and social challenges have to be overcome. Vaccines tested have failed to achieve expectations. While some progress has been achieved, it will still be many years before an HIV vaccine is licensed and widely available. Even with medical advances, individual practice of safe sex would remain paramount to reducing transmission.
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12/5/2016 Slides and Notes for 30/31 Image: McGraw Hill Living with HIV or AIDS Lecture Notes If you are HIV­positive, in addition to dealing with psychological and social issues you need to pay special attention to maintaining good health. If you are caring for someone with HIV or AIDS, you also have special needs. Fortunately, people with HIV are living longer, healthier lives today, thanks to new and effective treatments. It is important to find a physician who has experience working with HIV and AIDS and is sensitive to the issues confronted by individuals infected with HIV. In addition to appropriate medical treatment, factors that can help promote your continuing good health include good nutrition, plenty of rest, exercise, limited (or no) alcohol use, stress reduction, and taking ART. In addition, if you decide to have sexual contact with another person, it means practicing safer sex, even if your partner is also HIV­positive. Researchers caution that one can become reinfected with different HIV strains. If you are living with HIV or AIDS, you may need many kinds of support: medical, emotional, psychological, and financial. Your doctor, your local health department and social services departments, local AIDS service organizations, and the Internet can help you find all kinds of help. Both current and past partners should be notified so that they can be tested and receive counseling. In many states, HIV­infected people are required by law to notify current and recent sexual and needle­sharing partners. AIDS counselors and health­care practitioners currently encourage those with HIV to make all possible efforts to contact past and current partners.
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12/5/2016 Slides and Notes for 31/31 Final Thoughts Lecture Notes HIV/AIDS is a major health challenge domestically and internationally. It is transmitted primarily through sexual contact and issues of ignorance, denial of risk, stigmatization, and discrimination, act as barriers to progress and controlling the epidemic. We do not have to continue to die as a result of a disease that is totally preventable.
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  • Spring '08
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