Four primary inputs of fuel model fuel moisture

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four primary inputs of fuel model, fuel moisture, windspeed, and slope percent are tied to fire behavior outputs. Rate of spread, flame length, fireline intensity, and probability of ignition have been discussed in previous units. These four output values, plus the basic input values, are all used in the fire control planning process. Each of the segments of planning involves
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consideration of each of the fire behavior input and output values. This planning, and subsequent field operations, will determine success in meeting fire management objectives. The first planning segment we will discuss, starting on page 5, is the location of control lines. First of all, we should clarify some commonly used terminology. Although firelines and control lines are frequently used interchangeably, they have a slightly different meaning. Fireline is defined as the part of a control line that is scraped or dug to mineral soil. Firelines are constructed by hand tools or mechanical means. Control lines usually include firelines but also can consist of artificial and natural barriers, retardant lines, and noncombustible fuels. Several considerations are given to the locations of control lines. These are the accessibility and safety for control forces; resource values at risk from the fire and from control actions; the general shape of terrain and available barriers; current weather and weather forecasts; fuel characteristics over time and space; and direct and indirect attack methods used. All of these affect tactical decisions on fire control line locations. You will want to come back to these later. Figure 2 illustrates the basic tactics of flanking a fire burning on a slope or driven by wind. Firelines, starting from the rear of the fire, are located and constructed along either flank as close to the fire as possible. As fireline construction progresses, the line is burned out or the main fire is allowed to burn clean to the constructed line. Eventually, line construction will catch up with the head and pinch it off at an advantageous time. It's essential to have firelines anchored to a safety zone, or to create safety zones as work progresses along the flanks. Please turn to page 6. Flanking fires, especially those that are spreading rapidly in one direction, is common practice for several very good reasons. In item B please list the following: The rate of spread on flanks is less, forces can work closer due to less heat, it's easier to anchor lines and plan escape routes, narrower firelines are required to stop spread, and flanks may be the only safe areas to work direct attack. Come back and study these reasons later, as you will be required to know them. Now do question 1; mark your choice or choices. In question 1, you should have marked all the choices. Generally speaking, these are all acceptable and recommended fireline practices for most areas. Number 4 states, "Keep one foot in the burn in light fuels." This is an expression sometimes used by firefighters meaning burn out
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  • Spring '04
  • MIchealJenkins
  • Combustion, fuel, Wildfire, fireline, firelines

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