Fig 259 eukaryotic cells are bigger than prokaryotic

Info icon This preview shows pages 5–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fig. 25.9 Eukaryotic cells are bigger than prokaryotic cells, and have a much greater degree of compartmentalization of functions. What are the advantages of this compartmentalization?
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Protists - 6 C. DIPLOMONADS 1. Diplomonads are among the simplest eukaryotes. 2. Features of Giardia (the cause of giardiasis, or beaver fever) Fig. 28.2 After the secondary endosymbiosis, might you expect to find traces of the primary host cell (eg. the nucleus) in the secondary host? Where in the secondary host would a remnant of the primary host’s nucleus be, if there was such a remnant?
Image of page 6
Protists - 7 D. DINOFLAGELLATES 1. Half of all dinoflagellates are photosynthetic; the rest lack plastids and are heterotrophic. 2. Their unusual form is conferred by vesicles containing cellulose that lie under the plasma membrane. 3. A few dinoflagellates are responsible for some red tides and toxic shellfish. 4. Dinoflagellate cell cycle oddities § the nucleus does not disintegrate during mitosis § chromosomes are numerous (in the hundreds) and remain condensed throughout the cell cycle 5. Chloroplasts origins
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Protists - 8 E. APICOMPLEXANS 1. All members are parasites of animals, and have complicated life cycles. 2. Plasmodium is the causative agent of malaria. Fig. 28.10 Why is Plasmodium invisible to our immune system for much of its life cycle?
Image of page 8
Protists - 9 F. OOMYCETES 1. They closely resemble fungi but are not closely related to fungi. § Oomycetes have flagella (one smooth, one hairy) that link them to other stramenopiles, such as brown algae, not to fungi. § Oomycetes have cellulose in their cell walls. § Oomycetes have diploid nuclei in their hyphae. 2. Ecological roles: decomposers, plant pathogens § Phytophthora infestans – cause of the late blight of potatoes, Ireland, 1845-46. § Plasmopara viticola – cause of downey mildew of grape, France, late 1870s. Fig. 28.17 After you have studied the fungus section later in the course, come back to this picture and note the funguslike and non- funguslike features of this life cycle.
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Protists - 10 G. DIATOMS 1. Diatoms are responsible for 50% of marine photosynthesis and 25% of the biosphere’s photosynthesis. 2. The cells are surrounded by two silica shells, or frustules, that fit together at the rims. 3. Diatom species have lost one or both of the two flagella that characterize Stramenopila. H. BROWN ALGAE 1. Includes kelps and intertidal seaweeds. 2. Most species have alternation of generations. § Multicellular sporophyte (2n) and multicellular gametophyte (1n) stages. § Stages are heteromorphic in some species, isomorphic in others. 3. Organs of the sporophyte § holdfast – § stipe – § blade –
Image of page 10
Protists - 11 Fig. 28.16 In Laminaria , as in other species with heteromorphic alternation of generations, the gametophyte and sporophyte do not resemble each other at all. How would you determine that a sporophytic thallus (body) and a gametophytic thallus belonged to the same species?
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Protists - 12 I. GREEN ALGAE 1. Very diverse in growth habit.
Image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern