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Related to pancreatic dysfunction all 3 previous

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Related to pancreatic dysfunction; all 3 previous conditions can result in severely diminished pancreatic exocrine function which can significantly compromise digestion and absorption of igested nutrients; failure to digest or absorb fats (steatorrhea –fats not metabolized adequately in body – excessive fat in stool) which renders greasy appearance to feces Testing: Examination of stool fat- detection of mal-absorption; steatorrhea; Qualitative- is there fat? # of fat droplets; > 100 = a significant amount D-xylose test Detection of mal-absorption in intestines; it’s a pentose sugar usually not found in the blood in any significant amnt. As w/ other monosaccharides, pentose sugars are absorbed unaltered in the proximal small intestine and do not require the intervention of pancreatic lytic enzymes. Therefore, the ability to absorb d-xylose is of value in differentiating mal-absorption of intestinal etiology from that of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. B/c only about one half of orally administered d-xylose is metabolized by action of intestinal bacteria, significant amnts are excreted in the urine Amylase Testing Increases in amylase in serum; particularly useful in diagnosis of acute pancreatitis; increases in serum concentration of AMY occur in about 75% of patients. Typically AMY in serum increases w/in a few hrs. of the onset of the disease, reaches a peak in about 24 hrs., and b/c of its clearance by the kidneys, returns to normal w/in 3-5 days, often making urine AMY a more
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