We may pass by the somewhat irregular arrangement of the week This content

We may pass by the somewhat irregular arrangement of

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(We may pass by the somewhat irregular arrangement of the week.) This content downloaded from 157.92.4.71 on Thu, 12 Sep 2013 16:29:13 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
70 THE EPIGRAMS OF CALLIMACHUS Again Dr. Ede, Dean of Worcester, has on his tomb the punning Latin inscription 'Ede quis es' 'Ede' 'Ede cur hic' 'Quia praefuit aedi'. It is untranslatable, though Dean Church might help with the last word. Perhaps it might be transferred to a politician named State. 'State who you are' 'State' 'State why here' 'As head of State'. It will be noted that the presence of a pun does not make a name ficti- tious. We must return to the apparent simplicity of the Nicoteles epitaph. The simplicity is real, but it is also deceptive. The verse is shaped to end on the pathetic irony of the boy's name-Victor. More, the father's name Philip means Horse-lover. I think that it is reasonably certain that 'riv irro?~'ilv k?-ric8a means 'the favourite' and probable that dTrrre0KE means 'sent to the knackers'. The result-except that names mean less to us-is more like Mr. Ryder Senior retired his twelve-year-old son here, the favourite, Victor. Again the real point of the Saon epitaph lies in the name, which might be paraphrased as Justus Wright of Thornbury. Acanthus stands in sharp contrast to the name, as death to the man, and the name Saon, 'Justus', appearing as early in the poem as a word of that rhythm can, is taken up by Tro1S /yaceois, 'the righteous', at the end. There are many more examples of this. Thus Aeschra ('Ugly') was a good milk, i.e. a good nurse, and the name and the epithet are put alongside one another in startling oxymoron, and Miccus ('Tiny') was not small in generosity; here the play depends on paradox (49 GP, 50 Pf). A similar effect is used with brilliant irony in an epitaph on a merchant (38 GP, 18 Pf). His name, Lycus, appears in the first line; the last line is a warning to sailors to avoid the sea when the Kids are setting, a group of stars in Auriga often associated with bad weather. Lycus means Wolf. It is usually the Wolf who devours the Kids; here the Kids have devoured the Wolf. A few more examples. Aceson ('Doctor') pays a debt to Asclepius, god of healing (24 GP, 54 Pf). Micylus ('Tich') had little resources, and asks the earth to be light upon him (47 GP, 26 Pf). Conopion ('Gnat') gives her lover sleepless nights (63 GP, 63 Pf). One quatrain on a victorious gamecock includes not only the owner's name, Euaenetus ('Glorious'), but the father's name Phaedrus ('Brilliant'), and the grandfather's, Philoxenus ('Hospitable'). There may have been some This content downloaded from 157.92.4.71 on Thu, 12 Sep 2013 16:29:13 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
THE EPIGRAMS OF CALLIMACHUS 71 family reason for including the grandfather, or there may be a punning allusion which we have lost. This same punning mood is displayed over ordinary words in one epigram.

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