These quotes allude to the famous myth of Apollo driving his chariot and the

These quotes allude to the famous myth of apollo

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 6 pages.

on his travels without rest or slumber” (Thoreau 111).  These quotes allude to the famous  myth of Apollo driving his chariot and the sun around the earth, causing sunrise and  sunset.  By referencing this myth, Thoreau shows how he is overwhelmingly awed by the
Image of page 4
train’s ability to be punctual, powerful, and important.  He clearly feels amazed and  almost intimidated by how  much the community relies on the train, such as how “farmers set their clocks by them,  and thus one well-conducted institution regulates a whole country” (Thoreau 111), similar to how the Ancient Greeks relied upon the sun.  Furthermore, Thoreau’s choice of  allusion to Apollo emphasizes the train’s power and its parallel  Yao 5 to civilization and society.  Since Apollo was known for his support for the arts and  civilization, the allusion rejects Thoreau’s intentions of leaving civilization behind at  Walden Pond.  Thoreau uses this allusion to match his true reverence for Apollo and his  divine powers, therefore showing maximum praise for the train when he compares it to  him.  Although Thoreau escapes to Walden Pond to try to deprive himself of civilization,  he realizes, through his fascination with the train, that nature and his surrounding  environment are reliant on it.   Henry David Thoreau sends mixed messages in his elaborate description about  the train in his book,  Walden .  However, through a careful analysis of his use of  metaphors, imagery, and allusions to Greek Mythology, Thoreau clearly has developed a  love-hate relationship with the train, and tells us that he does not simply hate the train.  In fact, its power and authority fascinate him, and he clearly respects how this well-oiled  machine makes both the natural and civilized environments run like clockwork.   Thoreau’s contradicting feelings for the train is actually a microcosm for how so many  things in life are not what they appear to be.  Like Yin and Yang, the things you hate and 
Image of page 5
love may be somehow interconnected, and working together to make the your world run  like a well-oiled machine. Works Cited Thoreau, Henry David.  Walden and Other Writings . Ed. Brooks Atkinson. New York:  Modern Library, 1992. Print.
Image of page 6

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture