In addition criminal justice in america provides mod

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In addition, Criminal Justice in America provides mod- els for taking the learning process outside the class- room into the community. It contains opportunities for making field visits to criminal justice institutions such as courts and police facilities, conducting and analyz- ing opinion polls, doing outside research, and con- ducting crime prevention and police-community projects. These activities not only promote service learning, they also help students compare the theoret- ical to actual practices and learn about specific laws and procedures that apply to their own jurisdiction. In reviewing the materials, note that instructions for conducting the various activities are built into the text. It is important that the teacher utilize as many of these learning opportunities as possible. They are de- signed to: Improve comprehension and concept building by giving the learner the opportunity to review the content covered and apply it to a problem or hy- pothetical situation in a meaningful and chal- lenging way. Develop analytical and critical-thinking skills by making inferences, evaluating evidence, predict- ing consequences, weighing benefits and costs, identifying and generating alternatives, and stat- ing and supporting opinions and decisions. Connect the theoretical and abstract learning of the classroom to real-world domains of issue-ori- ented citizenship, including those of political and institutional decision making, policy formulation, and political participation. The following is a brief guide to help teachers plan for and utilize the major teaching strategies employed in the text. It is recommended that teachers review these general guidelines before conducting the vari- ous strategies and refer back to them as required. Directed Discussion Directed discussion is an essential part of classroom learning and especially important in civic and law-related education. It gives the learner an opportunity to check comprehension of the material, compare observations with other classmates, practice communication, develop confidence, and practice higher-order analytical and critical- thinking skills. Each reading in the text is supported by questions to help teachers conduct directed discus- sions about the major terms and concepts it contains. Sample answers for more technically oriented and higher-order questions are provided for guidance. De- pending on the skill levels of the class, the teacher may wish to add and ask additional questions, as necessary. In discussing a reading or debriefing an activity, it is always important to employ effective questioning techniques, including proper “wait time,” appropriate verbal and non-verbal cues, and necessary follow- up. It is also important that all students get the op- portunity to answer questions, which may require calling on less assertive learners, as necessary.
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