47 Ibid 48 US Bureau of the Census World Population Profile 1998 WP98

47 ibid 48 us bureau of the census world population

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47. Ibid. 48. U.S. Bureau of the Census, World Population Profile: 1998 , WP/98 (Washington, DC, 1999), 45. 49. World Bank, World Development Indicators CD- ROM 2004 [computer file] (Washington, DC: Inter- national Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) [producer], 2004). 50. World Bank, Global Economic Prospects 2005: Trade, Regionalism, and Development [computer file] (Washington, DC: IBRD [producer], 2005). 51. For more information on poverty reduction strate- gies, see T. Banuri, review of Investing in Development: A Practical Plan to Acheive the Millennium Goals , by UN Millennium Project, Environment , November 2005 (this issue), 37. 52. Inglehart, note 26 above. 53. Inglehart, note 26 above. 54. Inglehart, note 26 above. 55. Environics International (GlobeScan), Consumer- ism: A Special Report (Toronto: Environics International, 2002), 6. 56. Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, note 25 above. 57. Dunlap, Gallup Jr., and Gallup, Health of the Planet: Results of a 1992 International Environmental Opinion Survey of Citizens in 24 Nations, note 23 above, page 57. 58. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 55 above, pages 3–4. 59. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 55 above, pages 3–4. 60. T. Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions (New York: Macmillan, 1899). 61. Inglehart, note 26 above. 62. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 30 above, page 133. 63. The European Opinion Research Group, note 32 above, page 70.
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64. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 23 above. 65. For example, see J. Flynn, P. Slovic, and H. Kun- reuther, Risk, Media and Stigma: Understanding Public Challenges to Modern Science and Technology (London: Earthscan, 2001). 66. International Social Science Program, Envi- ronment II , (No. 3440) (Cologne: Zentralarchiv für Empirische Sozialforschung, Universitaet zu Koeln (Central Archive for Empirical Social Research, Univer- sity of Cologne), 2000), 114. 67. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 30 above, page 139. 68. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 30 above, page 141. 69. Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, note 25 above, page T20. 70. Chicago Council on Foreign Relations (CCFR), Worldviews 2002 (Chicago: CCFR, 2002), 26. 71. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 30 above, page 163. 72. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 30 above, pages 156–57. 73. Environics International (GlobeScan), note 30 above, page 157. 74. W. J. Baumol, R. R. Nelson, and E. N. Wolff, Convergence of Productivity: Cross-National Studies and Historical Evidence (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994). 75. A. K. Sen, Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1981). 76. Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, note 5 above, page 37. 77. World Values Survey, note 20 above. 78. World Values Survey, note 20 above. 79. The human development index (HDI) measures a country’s average achievements in three basic aspects of human development: longevity, knowledge, and a decent standard of living. Longevity is measured by life expectancy at birth; knowledge is measured with the adult literacy rate and the combined primary, second- ary, and tertiary gross enrollment ratio; and standard of living is measured by gross domestic product per capita (purchase-power parity US$). The UN Develop- ment Programme (UNDP) has used the HDI for its annual reports since 1993. UNDP, Questions About the
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