to review the information written on the dry erase board and make use of

To review the information written on the dry erase

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to review the information written on the dry erase board and make use of strategies (cubes and drawn models) as students seem to need direction. As the teacher circulates, each group is reminded to make sure all group members agree with theinterpretation of the problem, the operations being used, the strategy, etc.(This is to insure that students with less developed number sense, weaker proficiency and/or language barriers benefit from their grouping with students who have stronger number sense and proficiency, as they work to solve their group’s problem). As groups reach a solution to their problem, the teacher checks their work for accuracy, asking questions about the strategies and processes their group used. After a few minutes, the teacher gives the call that the class has about three more minutes to finish up their problem. After that time has passed, the teacher divides each group, asking two students from a group that was working on problem #2 to switch places with two students from a group that was working on problem #3 (This transition is to set up reciprocal teaching partnerships. Of the four table-groups of students, two groups were working on problem #2, whilethe other two groups were working on problem #3. Each table-group consisted of 4 students. Thistransition is essentially placing two students from each group with two students from a different group, for the purpose being to work in a partnership to teach their new group members how to solve the problem their original group already solved.)The teacher instructs all of the students who were originally placed in groups that completed problem #2, to “teach” their new group members how to work through problem #2 (“You guys are going to be the teachers, now! You and your table-group did such a great job at using your cubes,or drawing circles, to decide if your story needed and addition or subtraction problem to find out ‘how many ducks’…you guys did such a great job finding your sum or difference- now you get
help your new group members find out ‘how many ducks’, too”). As the “problem #2 pairs” beging “teaching”, the teacher circulates, taking notes to record the level of proficiency at which the “teachers” understand and teach problem-solving strategies and skills relevant to the problem to their “students”. After a few minutes, the teacher gives the call that the class has three minutes or so left to finish their problem. During this time the teacher takes note of which groups seem to be reaching correct answers and which groups are still struggling, intervening to provide prompts, ask targeted questions (“What information is in your story that can help us decide if we are setting up an addition or subtraction problem?”, “How many ducks did you begin with? Now, how many ducks did you end up with? Are you going to use cubes or draw circles to represent those ducks?”)and refer to the supports written/drawn on the board to help the group achieve success.

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