English 802 Spring 2013 JUding the past assign

It serves as a wake up call of the consequences that

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It serves as a wake up call of the consequences that could become a reality if we continue on with behaviors or decision making that is not beneficial to our growth. In the early days of this country, there was no nation, there was no unity. Settlers migrated here to free themselves from the brute force reign of Great Britain. This new land brought about a sense of prosperity and a fresh beginning. As the country flourished expanded outward, so did the ambitions of our forefathers. As mentioned in the opening
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lines of Denial and Dependence (572), their visions of independence served as their drives and made them seemingly unstoppable to anyone that was in the way of what they believed to be their destiny. The times of the people who were natives of the frontier are prominent examples of this vision. Filled with times of hope and promise to times of desperation and discouragement, depending on what end of the spectrum one was on, the expansion of the West can be described as a gift and a curse. For those such as C. W. Dana who wrote about the new lands in From the Great West; or The Garden of the World , it was considered to be the new “land of milk and honey” and stated that newcomers to the land were “carrying with them the indominitable Anglo- Saxon energy and the stern virtues of their fathers, and more than all, minds which the common school has trained into strong intellectual growth, thus fitting them to be master spirits of a new era.” (556) It is this sense of superiority and pride that onlookers of today see as the arrogance of the western colonists. On the other hand, the same Anglo-Saxon energy that Dana spoke gave a sense of uneasiness to that of the indigenous Native American people who were the original dwellers of this land. One prime example of the disregard for the indigenous people that In Plenty Coups Travels to Washington , he speaks of going there to negotiate on behalf of the Native American people, to prevent a railroad from being built through their hunting grounds. He speaks of traveling by stage coach for long days and nights finally to meet with the President of the United States in order to discuss and negotiate ways around building the railroad in the middle of their lands. Because they have made themselves out to be such sophisticated and reasonable people, Plenty, as well as a majority of the Native Americans addressed their disagreements with the Americans
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through negotiation and peaceful protests. At this meeting with President Hayes, Plenty did just that and stood tall on the objections of his people. He states that “We had several conferences with him in which he tried to overrule our objections, but he failed.” In the end of the negotiations, Coups goes on to state that “then the President said that he would grant our request to remain in the country where we lived, but in return he expected us to let him build a railroad in the valley of the Yellowstone .” It was also agreed that As he held up his end of the deal, the same could not be said for President Hayes. Promises
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