Cloning conferences manifold challenges challenges

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Cloning conferences …
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Manifold challenges Challenges based on the claim that these developments reflect humans’ arrogance— an attempt to become “God-like.” These challenges and others are often ethical in nature, and only sometimes legal For example, claims based on the nonhuman animals’ suffering created by one practice or another.
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Prudence-based challenges Some challenges are prudential in nature … … risk factors being unknown … … so “precautionary principle” dictates “go slow” attitude → → E.g., challenges that rely on an assessment that biotech developments involve high risk of environmental harm
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Politics-based challenges Some challenges are essentially political … directed against globalization because so much biotech is promoted by multinational companies … directed against economic dislocation or cultural damage … directed against some countries’ concern to develop economic advantage internationally, regardless of the social, cultural, ethical, or environmental risk
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Teaching/research hospital complications
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So what’s veterinary medicine to do? Practical issues for veterinarians can seem innocuous … … but legal implications can arise if mishandled. Student issues … generally, minor on research animal issues
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Comparing legal and ethical protections Laboratory Animals Significant federal protections since 1985—Rollin says this means changed social consensus Rats, mice and birds excluded (formally in 2002) Farm Animals No effective protections (Wolfson) September 2005, JAVMA reports on Rollin’s claim that social value changing Public perception may be changing
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