2015 Furthermore school performance can also be negatively affected due to

2015 furthermore school performance can also be

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social isolation can lead to further sedentary activity and additional weight gain (Sahoo et al., 2015). Furthermore, school performance can also be negatively affected due to increased school absence, mainly when a chronic condition even exists (Sahoo et al., 2015).
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Health Issues and Risks Children who are overweight or obese are at higher risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol, risk of impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, joint problems, musculoskeletal discomfort, breathing problems, low self-esteem and impaired physical, and emotional functioning (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2015). Puberty is a difficult transition for pre-teens. Female children with an increased BMI often enter puberty earlier than females with a normal BMI (Ball et al., 2015). Entering puberty prematurely may foster social isolation and a negative sense of body image in a pre-teen. Although there are significant health risks in being overweight or obese, being too aggressive can cause a different set of problems. The practitioner must be sensitive to the parents and the child’s self-perception of body image. Placing too much emphasis on weight can promote negative behaviors such as dieting and other eating disorders. A complete assessment is always warranted when addressing a specific lifestyle issue especially before suggesting changes. It would be essential to find out what medications the child may be taking that may increase body weight. An assessment of their current diet would be useful to see what improvements could be made. Looking at the child’s growth history and inquiring if there has been a change in activity. It would also be essential to
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  • Nutrition, 95th percentile, Martin et al., Overweight 5-year-old boy, normal BMI

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