Lets go ahead and launch control panel and lets go to

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Let's go ahead and launch Control Panel. And let's go to system and security. Let's go to firewall. And let's say that we want to turn the firewall off. We're crazy, we trust people way too much and we're going to turn the firewall off on this system. I click this option, and notice here that instead of just confirming that we want to elevate privileges for that process, instead we have to first authenticate asan administrative user. Before we're allowed to elevate that processes privileges. So I've only got one administrative user account on this system and that's the test out student account we were logged in as before. So before I can allow this Control Panel process to turn the firewall off I've got to first authenticate as an administrative user. And that's because my K Sanders user account does not even come close to having enough privileges to manage the firewall on this system. Now remember when we were logged in as an administrative user previously all we had to do was just confirm, say yeah go ahead and give that process elevated privileges to the system. But if we're logged in as a limited user it's a whole different story. We first have to authenticate as an administrative user and then I'm allowed to specify that that process run with elevated privileges on the system. And as we talked about earlier, this privilege elevation is only viable for one single task.
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For example in this case turning the Windows firewall off. Which is really not a good idea. The privilege elevation process we just went through does not extend to other Control Panel tasks. For example let's go back to up here under Control Panel. Let's go to system and security. And let's pick a different task that we want to run that requires administrator level privileges to the system. Such as allowing remote access to the system. I click on this option and even though we elevated privileges earlier we still have to do it again. We have to first authenticate as an administrative user then I'm allowed to perform administrative level tasks on the system. The privilege elevation only applies to performing the specific task that you selected. Try anything else you've got to elevate privileges a second time. Let's go ahead and close Control Panel. Command Prompt as an Admin 7:13-10:01 Now the process of privilege elevation also applies to commands that you run from the command prompt. Let's go ahead and start a command prompt session. Go ahead and launch it. Now there are two issues in force here. First of all I'm logged in to the system as a standard user account. Non-administrative user. And by default when I launch the command prompt window, its process runs with limited privileges on the system as well. It runs as a standard user account too.
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  • Spring '14
  • Task Manager, Hard disk drive

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