Lancelot would have poured out his woe if the queen had listened but to pain

Lancelot would have poured out his woe if the queen

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ask your reasons." Lancelot would have poured out his woe if the queen had listened, but to pain and embarrass him further she refused to answer him a single word and passed instead into a bedchamber.” (256). His love is reflected in the way that he does not yell at Guinevere nor speak badly of her. I believe that Lancelot must have been a little bit frustrated with her attitude toward him; he traveled so far and risked his life to save her and Guinevere won’t even give him an
McGinley 4 audience. She’d rather remain with her captors. I view this event as a true moment where the author is developing Lancelot’s character. We see him as an aggressive and brave knight, who sometimes challenges confrontation full on, to a humbled and devoted servant to the queen who is willing to defeat once he learns that his lover does not wish to see him. Lancelot’s submission to the queen’s wishes shows his complete devotion to courtly love, which, in essence, makes him the perfect lover. He obeys her wishes in absolute, even though her desire not to see him disappoints and frustrates him. Overall, the motif of courtly love throughout the text proves that Lancelot’s and Guinevere’s relationship instills the values of the social good in The Knight of the Cart. Knightly attributes such as honor, mercy, and courtesy are displayed by Lancelot and fueled by his love for the queen, Guinevere. Lancelot’s character development throughout the text brings to light just how much he loves Guinevere and the lengths he is willing to go in order to save her from Meleagant. Lancelot’s courtly love allows him to submit and devote his time and effort to saving Guinevere throughout the story, and his honor, mercy, and courtesy allow him to be successful in the end, reunited with his lover. Works Cited De Troyes, Chrétien, and William W. Kibler. “The Knight of the Cart (Lancelot).” Arthurian Romances , Penguin Books, 1991, pp. 207–294.

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