Response percent graph no 26 32 total number of

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Response # Percent Graph Yes 55 68% No 26 32% Total Number of Responses: 81 a. Would you believe the results of this survey? Why or why not? No; lots of reasons. Don’t know how (if) a sample was selected, if there was a sample size and if so, what it was. The question is worded in a somewhat misleading way (Asking :Do you agree implies they want you to say yes). b. Evaluate each of the following: i. Type of sample: Not sure; the term “quick pool” implies a volunteer sample meaning they just posted it on the web and asked people to respond. But it could be a simple random sample if they choose people randomly and asked them to respond. Or it could be a census, where they actually did ask everyone in the dating service to respond. (Most likely it is a volunteer sample.) ii. Amount of data (sample size??? response rate??) Unknown (see answer to part a above). We do know only 81 people took the survey, which is a very low number (unless there are only 100 people in the dating service, for example.) iii. The wording of the question. If it’s not good, write up an alternative. Should mandetory background checks be a condition of becoming a member of an online dating service? iv. The way the results were summarized Graph is poor; no scale on it at all. Also no mention of the original sample size.
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Stat 133 Recitation 3.1-3.2 11. Are there gender differences in preferences for health insurance plans? A market researcher interviews 100 women and 100 men who are all health insurance consumers. She asks each person which features he or she considers essential in a health plan. She compares the results for men vs. women. a. What type of study is this (an observational study or an experiment) and why? Observational; no treatment was imposed. b. Evaluate the design of this study in terms of what we learned in lecture. This is a stratified type of sample but we don’t know how it was selected; we don’t know if it was random or not, which is a problem. Coding the answers to this ‘open question’ could be difficult; very hard to get reliable data from this. For example, how many items should each person list? Question is too open ended; people might not know what she is looking for. c. What sorts of bias could creep into this study? How can you help eliminate them? Lots of possibilities here. Bias due to the interviewer probing people or discussing the issues rather than just collecting data. Could be biased toward people who like to talk a lot and give a ton of answers, once she’s got their attention. Could be a great deal of nonresponse. 12. A bakery is testing to see if the height of a one-layer cake (in inches) is affected by the baking temperature and the rate at which the batter is stirred. They decide to investigate the effects of combinations of two temperatures (300 degrees F and 350 degrees F) and three stirring rates (60 rpm, 90 rpm, and 120 rpm) on the height of the cake. They bake 5 cakes at each combination of baking temperature and stirring rate.
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