Powers pyramid of khufu c 2551 2528 bce built of dry

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powers
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Pyramid of Khufu, c. 2551-2528 BCE
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built of dry masonry—piling stones on top of each other—here they are precisely fitted together weight of the stones holds the structure together Largest is 45 stories tall and covers 13 acres – 2,0000,000 blocks of stone weighing 2 ½ tons each – the base is level within 2 cm Wheels had not yet been invented in this part of the world four corners perfectly oriented toward the cardinal points of the compass—also, the “airshafts” align with different
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have been robbed throughout the centuries—filled with treasure and decorated with beautiful paintings and relief sculptures entrance would be carefully sealed and hidden, so grave robbers would dig tunnels into the main chambers
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limestone quarried along the Nile and floated along it during seasonal floods laborers dragged cut stones up temporary ramps—wheels had not yet been invented in this part of the world
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faced with white limestone—not much remains because later peoples stripped the stones to build other things
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Tomb of Nebamun, 1400 BCE Around 2,000 BCE upper middle classes begin to be able to afford less elaborate funerary monuments what kinds of imagery would have been standard inside a pyramid, and why? The name of the god Amun has been hacked out in this caption where it appears in Nebamun’s name and title. Shortly after Nebamun died, King Akhenaten (1352–1336 B.C.E.) had Amun’s name erased from monuments as part of his religious reforms
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Tomb of Nakht, 1422- 1411 BCE
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Khafre (Chephren) Enthroned, 2570 BCE what was the role of a Pharaoh? a personification of a god, but not a god himself the pharaoh was the only one who could approach the gods on the peoples’ behalf— responsible for both civic and religious success of the country he alone (except priests) could enter the temples and talk to the statues of the gods also images of the pharaoh in the temple so he’d always be there with the god is an image of a king supposed to look like him?
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Systrum of Teti, 2323 BCE
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Mace Head, 2350 BCE
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Seated Scribes, c. 2500 BCE
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Old Kingdom ends around 2100 BCE creates a division between northern and southern Egypt—the south has more original and individualized art forms in the Middle Kingdom Amun becomes the chief god— more important than the pharaoh statues of the pharaoh begin to be produced in quantity and also move outside tomb statues are idealized, but temple statues are naturalistic—doesn’t it seem like it should be the other way around?
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