3 principles of the people The Revolutionary Alliance in English Nationalism

3 principles of the people the revolutionary alliance

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3 principles of the people/ “The Revolutionary Alliance” in English Nationalism (expel the Manchus) Democracy People’s livelihood (Socialism) -- He traveled in capitalist countries and saw a stark difference between the rich and poor. Provincial president of the republic of China On the new Year of 1912 Qing was still there Governed northern China Had new army under Shikai Had no support or money, was more like a figurehead 1) What are the major ideas of Confucius and Lao Zi? Where are their major differences? 2) What are the major features of the traditional Chinese state? 3) Why was there a population explosion in the Qing? How did it influence the Chinese econ 4) What are the major steps leading to the expansion and consolidation of the Qing empire? 5) Why did unified dynasties predominate in imperial China? 6) What was the system that regulated China’s foreign relations before the Opium War? Why? 7) What happened to China’s foreign relations after the Opium War? Describe the major features of thenew system that shaped China’s foreign relations at the turn of the twentieth century. 8) Compare the Taiping rebellion and the Boxer rebellion, explaining what inspired their actions, what they attacked, what they wanted to achieve, how they treated the Qing rulers and foreigners, and why they failed. The Taiping Rebellion was begun for mainly religious reasons, namely the advancement of Christianity, as it was helmed by Hong Xiuquan who believed himself to be the younger brother of Christ. Because of this, the rebels of the Taiping Rebellion were incredibly fanatical and dedicated to their cause. The Taiping rebels treated the Qing government as their enemy and the West as also their enemy due to their role in helping to put down their rebellion. The cause of the Taiping rebels fighting their government oppressors became a key rallying cry in Mao’s efforts to create a resistance to the Kuomintang. The Boxer Rebellion was focused on reversing the influence of the West in China, in particular their oppressive policies and trade agreements. The Boxer Rebellion was comprised of mainly Buddhist and Taoist beliefs and as such was formed as an antithesis to the flood of Christian missionaries flooding into China from the west. They generally treated the Qing Government as allies and the west as enemies for obvious reasons. Though the rebellion was eventually quelled by the Coalition of 8 nations the European nations backed off of direct rule of China due to the rebellion. The Boxer Rebellion also led to Japan gaining international prestige for their role in helping to put down the rebellion. The Boxer Rebellion was focused on reversing the influence of the West in China, in particular their oppressive policies and trade agreements. The Boxer Rebellion was comprised of mainly Buddhist and Taoist beliefs and as such was formed as an antithesis to the flood of Christian missionaries flooding into China from the west. They generally treated the Qing Government as allies and the west as enemies for obvious reasons. Though the rebellion

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