Orientalism is a style of thought based upon ontological and epistemological

Orientalism is a style of thought based upon

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-Orientalism is a style of thought based upon ontological and epistemological distinction made between "the Orient" and (most of the time) "the Occident." -Thus a very large mass of writers, among who are poet, novelists, philosophers, political theorists, economists, and imperial administrators, have accepted the basic distinction between East and West as the starting point for elaborate accounts concerning the Orient, its people, customs, "mind," destiny, and so on. . . Orientalism-However, what Said is interested in is the Orient as a “regular constellation of ideas”-Acknowledging that “ideas, cultures and histories cannot seriously be understood without . . . their configurations of power being studied”-Said underscores that the discursive construction of the East is possible because the relationship between Occident and Orient is an asymmetrical one, a"relationship of power, of domination, of varying degrees of a complex hegemony.-How the Orient is represented in discourse.The Historical meaning-was enabled because of a “pattern of relative strength between East and West”.-Orientalism is a “western style for dominating, restructuring, and having authority over the Orient”. Three Qualifications for Dealing with OrientalismThe First:-Drawing on the Foucauldian notion of ‘discourse,’ rather than the familiar Marxist distinction between ideology or ‘false consciousness’ and scientific knowledge, Said stresses that Orientalism should not be thought of as a “structure of lies or of myths which, were the truth about them to be told, would simply blow away” . -Said’s point is that Orientalism is not merely some “airy European fantasy about the Orient” (6). It is, rather, a “system of knowledge about the Orient”
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The Second:-Said draws on Gramsci’s distinction between civil and political society, the latter consisting in stateinstitutions (the army, police, the central bureaucracy, etc.) and the former in voluntary affiliations like schools, families and unions.
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