4 3 MILESTONE THREE ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 7 The connection to the PICOT

4 3 milestone three annotated bibliography 7 the

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4-3 MILESTONE THREE - ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 7 The connection to the PICOT question is the correlation between education and acknowledgment of compassion fatigue and burnout, and the various interventions, coping skills, and interventions that can decrease CF and burnout. Hauser, J. M., & Bonow, R. O. (2017). Heart Failure and Palliative Care. Palliative Care,55(5), 901-910. doi:10.1016/b978-1-4377-1619-1.00027-5 In 2014 two key associations, (The American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and The Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association Annual Assembly), initiated three focus groups to look at individuals personal accounts of their individual perceptions of their own burnout, how burnout differs within hospice and palliative care compared to other groups, and approaches that may decrease burnout. In 2015, the agencies indicated 62% of clinical members in the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM) responded to a survey also indicated they were experiencing burnout. Compared to other medical specialties, this rate ranked significantly higher. An inductive/deductive qualitative analytic technique was utilized for analyzing the data from this study. The findings from this study include a small sample size of 20 palliative and hospice caregivers, and clearly, additional research may be indicated. However, for the hospice and palliative caregivers, usual sources of burnout were inclusive of increasing workloads, tensions between individual team members, and the ever-growing regulatory related issues. Participants in this study proposed various potential anti-burnout solutions, such as organizational support for self-care and other such solutions. There was an irregularity in the specific sources of burnout between the different clinician type and also form hospice to palliative care
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4-3 MILESTONE THREE - ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 8 settings. The results of this study reinforce a high-stress level for caregivers in hospice and palliative care. Although, there is a need to further research and look more closely at the seriousness and potential effects of burnout on hospice and palliative team members. Additionally, this study included various team members, including nurse practitioners but no registered nurses, as part of the small study group, of twenty. Hence, the data is limited as it relates to the PICO(T) question, which is seeking info regarding nurses, yet it does indicate caregivers in this arena have a higher degree of stress and burnout. This survey aimed to look at the sources of work-related stress and various ways of dealing with stress as it relates to burnout among hospice caregivers. The study also looked at the relationship between demographics of the caregivers and burnout, as well as the type of hospice services and the overall duration of care and the period of the hospice workers experience in that work environment. The sample included 241 health caregivers who were employed in twenty different hospices and who worked six months or longer in the field. A standardized survey tool, in the form of a questionnaire, was utilized. A tool
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