Ideally ever employment relationship would have a full complete employment

Ideally ever employment relationship would have a

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Ideally ever employment relationship would have a full complete employment contract according to common law duties and obligations. Relying upon common law dutieis and obligation to fill in the gaps of an employment relationship has important complications for employee discipline. Some employers may use demotions and transfers, and suspensions as a means of punishing workers who have transgressed workplace rules. Unless such disciplinary measures were a part of the employment contract, these action may be deemed to be a form of dismissal. Employees can terminate an employment contract by mutual consent, by the provision of adequate notice or for just cause. All other terminations by the employer can create an opportunity for a worker to claim they were wrongfully dismissed. The employer can terminate an employee that has proven unsatisfactory but not as a way that merits “just cause” doctrine. In some cases, an employer may have cause but wishes to end the relationship more amicable than by firing the workers for a cause (perhaps to forestall a lawsuit). Just cause – legitimate termination defined by conduct by an employee that is consistent fulfillment of implied conditions of employment Mutual consent – both parties agreement on termination, uncommon, written confirmations Constructive dismissal = changes in the terms of conditions of employment contract that employer disapproves of. Non-culpable dismissal – dismissal with notice or pay in lieu of notice
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19. What different approaches can organization take to compensate workers? There are many ways/approaches an organization can take in order to compensate workers. These include total compensation, direct compensation which is through benefits indirectly. Total compensation is the sum of direct and indirect compensation including base pay, incentives and benefits received in exchange for the employer’s contribution of time, talent, effort and results. Direct compensation is all types of financial rewards employees receive as part of their employment and defines the kinds of influences on managers making pay level decisions. Where as indirect compensation is the benefits and services employees receive in exchange for work, including the important role benefits play. There are many categories of total rewards that an organization can make in order to attract/compensate workers including pay, benefits (health/retirement), work and life rewards (paid time off and financial support), performance and recognition rewards (bonuses) and development career opportunities (education).
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20. How do employees judge whether compensation is fair? Employees always evaluate their pay benefits and perks to other employees. People often measure outcomes such as pay in terms of their inputs. For example, an employee might think of their pay in terms of degree, her three years of experience, and her 45+ hour workweeks. To decide whether or not a certain level of pay is equitable. The person compared her ration of outcomes and with inputs with other’s outcome/input ratios. In general employees compare their pay and contributions using several
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