certainly a desirable target But work in the nonprofit sector may present other

Certainly a desirable target but work in the

This preview shows page 23 - 25 out of 60 pages.

certainly a desirable target. But work in the nonprofit sector may present other means to achieve similar ends. Exploring the nonprofit route might be especially advis- able for recent college and business-school grads. For one thing, as already mentioned, corporate CSR jobs are especially hard to land for those starting out. However, the nonprofit sector is suffering from a shortage of leaders— a shortage that will only get worse as baby boomer nonprofit man- agers retire during the next several years. James Weinberg, founder of Commongood Careers, suggests that CSR- focused job seekers look closely at the 5 percent of nonprofits he calls “entrepreneur- ial”—fast-growing, aggressive organiza- tions that seek to eradicate the root causes of social prob- lems, he says, rather than to serve simply as support nets. A job with a non- profit can offer the same scope and execu- tive experience as a CSR position in a large corporation. “When you think of nonprofit jobs, you tend to think of local, community- based jobs—but they can be big,” says Patricia Palmiotto, director of the Allwin Initiative for Corporate Citizenship. When recruiting for CEOs, executive directors, COOs, directors of oper- ations and finance, nonprofits are now looking to business schools and to profes- sionals with experi- ence in the corporate world. Palmiotto cites a listing at the Environmental Defense Fund for a director of its Environmental Innovation Institute— a job that requires an MBA and ten years of experience. Another example: Tuck alumnus Curt Welling, a former investment banker, became CEO of AmeriCares, a Stamford, Connecticut nonprofit that delivers humanitarian assis- tance to war-torn areas and disaster zones.
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Careers with a Conscience 16 WETFEET INSIDER GUIDE CHAPTER 1 THE CSR PROPOSITION CHAPTER 3 A HOW-TO GUIDE CHAPTER 4 LANDING THE JOB CHAPTER 5 REAL PEOPLE PROFILES CHAPTER 6 FOR YOUR REFERENCE CHAPTER 2 THE JOB LANDSCAPE has more than doubled: The Social Investment Forum reports that in 2010, 250 such funds existed in the U.S., with assets of $316.1 billion. That growth spells a lot of opportunity for accountants, analysts, auditors, researchers, and finance professionals with a bent toward monitoring the three pillars of SRI performance—environmental, social, and governmental responsibility, aka ES&G. It also has created job opportunities in the many standards and accountability organizations that look over corporate documentation and ensure potential investment targets are living up to CSR standards. Such organizations range from nonprofits that set CSR standards to auditors who independently verify companies’ CSR reports. The growth of SRI also has created opportunities within corporations. These days, virtually all publicly held companies, in order to attract socially responsible investors, need finance professionals, investor relations specialists, and communications experts who understand the territory. Of course, those companies that have made big CSR commitments are more likely to make CSR awareness an overt part of any finance professional’s job.
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