organization GRAIN Todays global food crisis will not be solved by large scale

Organization grain todays global food crisis will not

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organization GRAIN: ‘Today’s global food crisis will not be solved by large-scale in - dustrial agriculture… but the governments, international agencies, and corporations steering the global food system are bankrupt in solutions’ (2010, p. 147). Building on this quotation, one should note that agribusiness is certainly not act - ing alone in promoting the food system it envisions as ideal, nor is it the only benefi - ciary of its practices. In this regard there is certainly a mutual ‘seeking out’ of players in the global food regime. Examining the larger dynamics of the political economy of the world food system, industry think tanks, research universities, and govern - ments throughout the world in cooperation with international agencies such as the World Bank, the Food and Agriculture of the United Nations and the World Food
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Feeding the Planet or Feeding Us a Line? 377 Programme among others, shape food policy in ways that benefits agribusiness. Consider again the international food aid regime noted above, for example, which Murphy and McAfee (2005) argue greatly profits global agribusiness that produces and transports food around the world in a market solely for this purpose. Critics ar- gue that this system actually creates more food insecurity under the guise of provid - ing assistance – contrary to what agribusiness or the sponsorship of the state would have the public believe. Another important collaboration between the state and agribusiness and its lob- byists and industry associations in both the United States and the European Union are agricultural subsidies and their implications in the world food system (see Pe- terson, 2009), particularly for the global peasantry. And of course, probably the most telling examples of these processes are the current global land grabs that epitomize Gronski and Glenna’s (2009) discussion of the global, profit-driven, and technology- intensive food production that overlooks the food injustices of the system and its effects on people who most depend on the land (see McMichael, 2012b; Cheru and Modi, 2013; White et al., 2013). Agribusiness acts with the complicity of the state, international organizations and agencies who help frame and support its interests. Grainwashing should therefore not be separated from the politics and policies that define the food system, shaping what farmers grow and what we ultimately eat (see Winders, 2009; Nestle, 2013). Therefore, future research should analyse further the collaborative and interlocking power dynamics shaping CSR, hunger, and the environment In closing, so widespread has been the impact and so fervent are the feelings of those refusing to be a part of the treadmill that new battle lines are being drawn and new visions of food justice are being formed to expose grainwashing and to take back the world food system (Bello, 2009; Patel and McMichael, 2009; Gottlieb and Joshi, 2010; Magdoff and Tokar, 2010). As part of this, the social sciences can take more active role in presenting this more critical alternative perspective (Rivera-Ferre, 2011). In portraying itself as socially responsible, agribusiness as ‘the supermarket to
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