This represents the bending of both light and time due to the masss attractive

This represents the bending of both light and time

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luminal spacetime resulting in the inward curvature of an approaching particle’s path towards the mass. This represents the bending of both light and time due to the mass’s attractive gravity force. Figure 4b illustrates how the real, observable mass in sublight space from Figure 4a may be viewed from the other side of luminal spacetime in superluminal space, rendering an inverse distortion appearing as a “bulge” whose source mass is blanketed by luminal spacetime. The approaching particle path in this case is curved away from the distortion, representing a repulsive or anti-gravity effect. Even if the source mass were in superluminal space instead, gravity would still behave as normal: it would attract particles in the same space as the source mass while repelling particles in the opposite space. Light would still be bent from the gravity curvature in either space, but in opposite directions. It is important to note that regardless of which space contains the true mass energy, the mass-induced, gravitational energy is equal in both spaces, even though the source mass can only exist in one. This concept is paramount in describing the proposed method of FTL travel to be introduced later. In short, both mass and energy are conserved such that where there is mass in one space, there is only an equivalent energy in the other, and that an energy state in one space does not necessarily require an equivalent mass in the other. Because of this, tachyons and tardyons will never directly interact due to the presence of the bounding luminal spacetime, nor will one space be directly “visible” from the other. The influence of gravity on luminal spacetime may be the only effect by which to detect the presence of superlight masses . (a) Subluminal Space. (b) Superluminal Space. FIGURE 4. Influence of a Gravitational Mass on Subluminal and Superluminal Spacetimes. If tachyons can exhibit real mass, then they would generate a real gravity in the same way as tardyons. According to the previous discussion, the tachyon mass energy would be reflected in subluminal space as an equal gravitational energy with no observable mass. Such disturbances, by interesting coincidence, is exactly what astronomers seek when searching for dark matter. Recent discoveries have also concluded that enormous dark matter “halos” surround most galaxies (IAU, 2003). Based on the prior discussions, the tri-space model proposes that dark matter is, in fact, tachyon mass in superluminal space whose presence is only observed by its gravitational effect on subluminal space. Although no detail will be given here, the tri-space premise can also explain the formation of such halos and can model the interactions of dark matter and dark energy on the accelerated expansion of the universe. The distinct relativistic differences between subluminal and superluminal realms dictate that tachyons cannot exist in sublight space and, conversely, tardyons cannot exist in superlight space. There is the possibility, however, that certain particles already discovered in the subluminal realm may have properties allowing them to exist in either space. Quarks seem to fit this description, and as with all particles, are subject to the strange laws of quantum
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