only real way to tighten our nutrient cycle and achieve sustainability in the

Only real way to tighten our nutrient cycle and

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only real way to tighten our nutrient cycle and achieve sustainability in the long term. “Diverscapes,” as Pretty calls them, can be quite colorful and pleasing to the eye. farmers also need reinforcement from the government for practices that provide services such as a tight nutrient cycle. Locally based agriculture can provide ecosystem services that are of great value in particular regions.
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Reading # 12; Redesigning Agriculture Boody and DeVore Answer the following questions in detail: What is the Haber-Bosch process – what does it have to do with agriculture? A: The Haber-Bosch process is the process of manufacturing nitrogen rich fertilizers to help crop growth. Nitrogen is a very important component to our atmosphere. Synthetic compounds eliminated the necessity of returning the nutrient in animal waste to fields in order to sustain new harvests, and they allowed the emergence of highly specialized cropping that is largely, or completely, separated from no less specialized and highly concentrated animal production. Long-distance transfers of fixed nitrogen have replaced this traditional pattern. In plant production the element moves in with purchases (imports) of fertilizers and goes out with sales (exports) of food and feed crops; in animal husbandry it comes in concentrate feeds (often imported from overseas) and goes out in meat, dairy, and aqua cultural products. (Smil 2001, p. 240) “the cycle that circulated nutrients from the land through animals and back again to the land has become leaky and significantly alters ecosystems” – comment in detail on this statement. A: This statement in laymen’s terms says that “there is a very fine line separating fertilizer as food production input and fertilizer as ecosystem-damaging waste product” (Boody And Devore). There is such a narrow window of opportunity for these annual row crops to take up nitrogen fertilizer that half or more of the nutrient is lost after it’s applied, finding its way into rivers and under- ground aquifers, and into the atmosphere as gases. Thus, the statement becomes leaky and alters ecosystems refers to the fertilizer having runoff and having negative effects.
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