Accident and Loss Statistics_Formulas

Based on lost workdays osha incidence rate number of

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
(Based on lost workdays) OSHA Incidence Rate = Number of lost workdays x 200,000 (Based on lost workdays) Total hours worked by all employees during period covered
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHE – 4284/5292 Industrial Safety Accident and Loss Statistics Concepts and Formulas 2. Fatal Accident Rate (FAR): This method is mostly used in the British Chemical Industry. This method is dependent on the number of exposed hours. Reports the number of fatalities based on 1000 employees working their entire lifetime. The employees are assumed to work at total of 50 years. FAR is based on 10 8 working hours. FAR = Number of fatalities x 10 8 Total hours worked by all employees during period covered 3. Fatality rate or deaths per person per year: This method is independent of the number of hours actually worked. Reports only the number of fatalities expected per person per year. Fatality Rate = Number of fatalities per year Total number of people in applicable population TABLE 1-2 : A GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED BY OSHA TO REPRESENT WORK RELATED LOSSES: OCCUPATIONAL INJURY is any injury such as a cut, fracture, sprain, amputation, etc., which results from a work accident or from an exposure involving a single incident in the work environment. OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS of an employee is any abnormal condition or disorder, other than one resulting from an occupational injury caused by exposure to environmental factors associated with employment. It includes acute and chronic illnesses or diseases which may be caused by inhalation, absorption, ingestion, or direct contact. LOST WORKDAYS are those days which the employee would have worked but could not because of occupational injury or illness. The number of lost workdays should not include the day of injury or onset of illness. The number of days includes all days (consecutive or not) on which, because of injury or illness (1) the employee would have worked but could not or (2) the employee was assigned to a temporary job, or (3) the employee worked at a permanent job less than full time, or (4) the employee worked at a permanently assigned job but could not perform all duties normally connected with it.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern