Lubb closure of AV valves during ventricular systole Dubb closure of semilunar

Lubb closure of av valves during ventricular systole

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Lubb – closure of AV valves during ventricular systole Dubb – closure of semilunar valves at the end of ventricular systole Pulse: what causes a pulse; describe how to find a specific type of pulse.
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Pressure changes causing alternating stretching and recoiling of arterial walls – palpable changes are the pul se. Type of pulse Which fingers? Where? temporal Middle Anterior to ear, zygomatic arch facial middle Arterior to masseter Posterior tibial Middle, index Medial malleolus Radial Middle, index Anterior of radius, near styloid process carotid Middle, index Angle of mandible Know the clinical significance of the tests performed in this lab. LAB 8: RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY, RESPIRATORY SOUNDS, SPIROMETERY & RESPIRATORY EXERCISES Methods for listening to changes in sound transmission in lung tissue. Percussion – tapping on chest Palpation – feeling with hands - vibrations
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Auscultation – listening to sounds Define/describe types of vibrations (associated with breathing) that can be felt. Pleural fremitus – friction between roughened surfaces of pleural membranes Rhonchal/bronchial fremitus – airway obstruction Tactile fremitus – low frequency vibrations – boy-o-boy, toy boat, scooby-doo Subjective fremitus – humming with mouth closed Tussive fremitus - cough Respiratory patterns: be able to identify by type or to define (or compare) specific types; brain regions associated with breathing rhythms and specific patterns. Wheeze – whistling, narrowed/obstructed airways Rhonchi – low pitch snoring, blocked airways Stridor – whistling, partial blockage in larynx or trachea Crackles/crepitations/rales – click, rattle, crackling on inhalation due to fluid accumulation, bronchitis, tb Pleural friction rub – low pitched rhythmic sounds from inflammation of pleurae, presence of tumours Spirometry: name the device used to measure – spirometer type of chart produced – spirogram calculate, name and/or define, and/or state the range for specific lung volumes, capacities, and other respiratory measurements volumes tidal volume – normal breath change – 500-1000mL inspiratory reserve volume – gasp in – 2000-3200mL expiratory reserve volume – blown out – 700-1200mL residual volume – 1000-1200mL capacities
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inspiratory capacity – maximum air that can be taken in in one breath – 2500-4200mL functional residual capacity –air remaining in system after normal exhalation – 1700-2400mL vital capacity – maximum air moved in and out of lungs – 3100-5000mL total lung capacity – maximum air that can be held in lungs – 4200-6000mL Other respiratory measurements Resp rate – 12-20 breaths per minute Minute resp volume – volume moved in and out of lungs in one minute – 10000-20000 lpm Anatomical dead space – volume of air not actively used in gas exchange – same as weight in pounds, but in mL Alveolar dead space – minimal in a healthy adult know which lung volumes and/or capacities are affected by specific disorders/breathing irregularities The Effect of Exhaling into Limewater: describe how the experiment is performed; what is
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