Some residents voiced concern that the rice could

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Some residents voiced concern that the rice could threaten certain species of rare migratory birds. Nevertheless, the wildlife agency approved the permits. Which of the following, if true, most helps to justify the wildlife agency’s approval of the permits, given the concerns voiced by some residents? A. In the region where the red-winged blackbirds stop, they are the first birds to be present in the spring. 25
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B. The poison that farmers want to use does not kill birds but rather makes them incapable of producing viable eggs. C. Since rice is not raised in Midland Province, few species of birds native to the province normally eat rice. D. Without the permit, any farmers shown to have set out poison for the blackbirds would be heavily fined. E. The poison that farmers got approval to use has no taste or smell that would make it detectable by birds. Answer: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q25 to Q27: Researchers studying how genes control animal behavior have had to deal with many uncertainties. In Line the first place, most behaviors are (5) governed by more than one gene, and until recently geneticists had no method for identifying the multiple genes involved. In addition, even when a single gene is found to control (10) a behavior, researchers in different fields do not necessarily agree that it is a “behavioral gene.” Neuroscientists, whose interest in genetic research is to understand the nervous system (which (15) generates behavior), define the term broadly. But ethologists—specialists in animal behavior—are interested in evolution, so they define the term narrowly. They insist that mutations in (20) a behavioral gene must alter a specific normal behavior and not merely make the organism ill, so that the genetically induced behavioral change will provide variation that natural selection can act (25) upon, possibly leading to the evolution of a new species. For example, in the fruit fly, researchers have identified the gene Shaker , mutations in which cause flies to shake violently under (30) anesthesia. Since shaking is not healthy, ethologists do not consider Shaker a behavioral gene. In con- trast, ethologists do consider the gene period (per), which controls the fruit (35) fly’s circadian (24-hour) rhythm, a 26
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behavioral gene because files with mutated per genes are healthy; they simply have different rhythms. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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