2011-12-15_015726_the_kite_runner_analysis

Amirs relationship with his father changes when they

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Amir’s relationship with his father changes when they go to the United States. His father is no longer a wealthy man of status bus is instead a poor immigrant working at a service station. Amir is the one who takes care of his father, rather than being under his father’s command, and he chooses his own path of becoming a writer. The United States is presented as a way out for Amir – both as a refuge from the political strife of Afghanistan as well as an escape from the memory of Hassan. The vastness of the new country makes it all the more of an escape – “beyond every freeway lay another freeway, beyond every city another city, hills beyond mountains and mountains beyond hills, and, beyond those, more cities and more people”. Most of all Amir’s new land exists to him as a release, no matter how temporary, from the power of memory, guilt, and responsibility: Long before the Roussi army marched into Afghanistan, long before villages were burned and schools destroyed, long before mines were planted like seeds of death and children buried in rock piled graves, Kabul had become a city of ghosts for me. A city of hare lipped ghosts.
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THE KITE RUNNER 9 America was different. America was a river, roaring along, unmindful of the past. I could wade into this river, let my sins down to the bottom, and let the waters carry me someplace far. Someplace with no ghosts, no memories, and no sins. After Amir’s father dies, he receives a call from Rahim Khan telling Amir to come to see him in Pakistan: “Come, There is a way to be good again”. Amir finds Rahim in a small apartment in Peshawar, emaciated and with only a few months to live. After much talk about the political situation, Rahim Khan reveals why he asked Amir to come see him: to tell Amir the truth about Hassan. After Amir and his father fled, Rahim Khan was living in their house and eventually asked Hassan and his wife to come and live with him. The couple had a son, Sohrab, who become orphan when Hassan and his wife were killed by the Taliban. Rahim Khan also reveals the long held family secret that Hassan is Amir’s half brother. Rahim Khan’s dying wish to Amir is to go to Afghanistan, find Sohrab, and bring him back. Amir is finally presented with the opportunity to redeem himself: “what Rahim Khan revealed to me changed things. Made me see how my entire life, long before the winter of 1975, dating back to when that singing Hazara woman was still nursing me, had been a cycle of lies, betrayals, and secrets. There is a way to be good again, he’d said. A way to end the cycle. With a little boy, an orphan Hassan’s son. Somewhere in Kabul”. After crossing the Kybar Pass and entering Afghanistan, Amir feels like a “tourist in my own country”, and his driver tells him, “That’s the real Afghanistan ... you have always been a tourist here, and just did not know it.” As Baba once told Amir about the religious mullahs, “They do nothing but thumb their prayer beads and recite a book written in a tongue they don’t
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THE KITE RUNNER 10 even understand… God help us all if Afghanistan ever falls into their hands”.
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