3 what did you learn that you can apply to your art

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3. What did you learn that you can apply to your art practice? In the second part of your post, list a question or questions that emerged for you from the reading(s). If there are multiple readings assigned for the week, please respond to both in your post, synthesizing and finding connections between the two. . Assessment : Posts will be evaluated for timeliness, completeness, and evidence of genuine and thoughtful engagement with the readings and the questions. The student’s own question must be included for full credit. Task 2: Formative Practice Due Date : 2/14; 4/10 Weighting : 10%
Description : Canvas will have a list of options of formative practices of particular salience to artists and that intersect with the course material. Twice during the semester, you will pick one of the options and follow the directions associated with that project. (Your second choice will be different from your first.) Assessment : Formation projects are graded for completeness, thoughtfulness, and evidence of dedication to the process. Task 3: Semester-long Writing Project: Theological Criticism of an Artwork Due Date: See Calendar Weighting : 60% Description : If we believe (along with Andy Crouch) that every cultural object is always already assuming something about the way the world is, the way the world should be, and what it means to be human in this world, then all cultural objects are already doing theology whether we’re alert to it or not. Over the course of the semester we are going to hone our abilities to think theologically about artworks by writing one paper that aims at carefully engaging, digesting, analyzing, researching, and interpreting a single artwork. For this project, you will choose one artwork (which can be broadly defined to include film, music, architecture, etc.) made by a prominent artist sometime in the last 150 years , and you will submit it to careful questioning. The primary goal of this paper is to offer your readers an interpretation of the work that specifically considers it against the interpretive horizons of theological lines of questioning. In other words, your task is to present a focused argument about how this artwork should be interpreted if theology is included within the field of relevant interpretive concerns . Although you will be writing one long paper over the course of the semester, you will be turning it in at multiple points along the way, receiving feedback at various stages in its development. In all, the paper will pass through four stages in which it will be turned in and evaluated: 1. Paper Proposal and Bibliography : A short statement that includes three items: 1) the artist, title, and date of the artwork you will be writing about 2) one short paragraph describing what interests you about this work and what questions you have about it at the beginning of your process of studying the work 3) a bibliography that identifies at least eight of the most important texts that have been written about this artist, this artwork, and/or the themes that you will be wrestling with in your paper. These need to be high-quality source texts: academic books, exhibition

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