The mind that thought of light heavy grey yellow

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another view of adjectives, a part of speech in a mythical grammar. The mind that thought of light, heavy, grey, yellow, still, swift, also conceived of magic that would make heavy things light and able to fly, turn grey lead into yellow gold, and the still rock into swift water. If it could do the one, it could do the other; it inevitably did both. When we can take green from grass, blue from heaven, and red from blood, we have already an enchanter's power upon one plane; and the desire to wield that power in the world external to our minds awakes.‖ (Tolkien, J. R. R, 1966, p. 48) Sub-creation is an artistic act, usually literary, in which a person fashions a fictional setting in some way unlike the real world. This fictional setting, or Secondary World, may then be imaginatively entered by the reader. If the Secondary World is skillfully constructed, it will produce in the reader what Tolkien calls Secondary Belief. He also explains in that essay that a fantasy writer creates a Secondary World and thus you try to create Secondary Belief. Critics often speak of the willing suspension of disbelief --a term used to mean that a work is believable enough that a reader is willing to put aside any disbelief and enjoy the story for what it is. Tolkien thought the term was unhelpful. Rather, he says, What really happens is that the story- maker proves a successful ‗sub - creator‘. He makes a Secondary World which your mind can enter. Inside it, what he relates is ‗true‘: it accords with the laws of that world. You therefore believe it, while you are, as it were, inside. The moment disbelief arises, the spell is broken; the magic, or rather art, has failed. You are then out in the Primary World again, looking at the little abortive Secondary World from outside. If you are obliged, by kindliness or circumstance, to stay. Then disbelief must be suspended (or stifled), otherwise listening and looking would become intolerable. (Tolkien, J. R. R, 1966, p. 60-61) Fantasy writers usually create a Secondary World in their literature so that readers can enter and get themselves lost in it. When their minds and imaginations can let go of the world they know and become completely absorbed in the fantasy world. However, no matter how imaginative the secondary world is, it must be founded on universal principles of reason and logic in order to ensure a consistent, coherent, and credible reality. It must also contain certain elements, such as characters, settings, and themes, which are so easily recognizable that readers can navigate in the unfamiliar world. Tolkien ‘s Middle -Earth is a prime example of a believable secondary world. In order to make Middle-Earth consistent and credible, Tolkien invents maps, languages, folklore, and histories. There is a detailed explanation to the languages and the letters of the Middle-Earth in The Hobbits. The first chapter begins with a detailed description of hobbits in general and Bilbo Baggins in particular.

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