Improving patient outcomes Nurses can improve patient outcomes by following

Improving patient outcomes nurses can improve patient

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Improving patient outcomes- Nurses can improve patient outcomes by following hospital protocols especially like in Mr. B’s scenario. His outcome would have been better if the nurse was more familiar with the conscious sedation protocol and continuously monitored the patient. A nurse should never be afraid to question a doctorspractice and always take the time to review hospital policies. They should lead by example and keep lines of communication open so that other follow suit. Influencing quality improvement activities- A nurse can influence quality improvement activities by attending continuing education opportunities and participating in the improvement plan. The new interventions that the nurse will have learned can be used in their daily routine and can be taught to other nurses. This is a positive way to influence other staff members while improving patient outcomes. E1. Since nurses are generally involved with direct patient care, the RCA and FMEA process is able to get valuable feedback from the nurse. Documentation, assessments, cardiac monitoring, etc are all performed by the assigned nurse. This demonstrates leadership qualities because nurses are such an important part of the interdisciplinary team. Doctors and other staff are constantly consulting with nurses and asking what the status of the patient is. If nurses were
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C489 TASK 27not involved in the RCA and FMEA process, crucial information get missed. When hospitals include nurses in the RCA and FMEA process, it promotes quality care, improves patient outcomes, and influences quality improvement activities.
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C489 TASK 28ReferencesCoda, B., Tanaka, A., Jacobson, R. C., Donaldson, G., & Chapman, C. R. (1997, May). Hydromorphone analgesia after intravenous bolus administration. Retrieved April 19, 2018, from Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)[PDF]. (2004) Institute for Healthcare Improvement.Retrieved from ?source=extension_pdfhandler&file=https%3A%2F%2Fsrm--c.na60.content.force.com%2Fservlet%2FfileField%3Fid%3D0BEa0000000bmICInstitute for Healthcare Improvement (2018) Responding to Adverse Events.Retrieved from -4c08-b495-59673b0a581a/lessonDetail/82f42955-31f0-40b2-bad2-c297a1e98f6c/page/2Institute for Healthcare Improvement (2018) Testing and Measuring Changes with PDSA Cycles. Retrieved from ?&CatalogGuid=6cb1c614-884b-43ef-9abd-d90849f183d4&CourseGuid=7ab177dc-a9cf-4d1d-b870-f4be6e8d8f67&LessonGuid=b1e7f83a-5ffa-4638-bf48-12af11b9f7d1Nursing Theory. (n.d.). Lewin’s Change Theory. Retrieved from -theory.org/theories-and-models/Lewin-Change-Theory.phpWilliams, P. M. (2001). Techniques for root cause analysis. Proceedings (Baylor University. Medical Center), 14(2), 154–157.
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