ableism is then the purpose of the study the method the experiment data

Ableism is then the purpose of the study the method

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ableism is, then the purpose of the study, the method, the experiment, data collection and results, the various voices, themes, policy recommendations, limitations and discussions. Thus, speaking of one matter, they break down different issues in order for the reader to grasp a better concept of these issues. This is done in the form of the subheadings of each action/subtopic. b. The author uses raw data, which was collected throughout their experiment of 8 self-identified disabled students from post-secondary institutions in Calgary, Alberta c. The authors’ method of collecting data was done through the experiment by asking the eight chosen students these specific questions and their thoughts and feelings towards it. 1. What do the words “impaired and “disabled” mean to you? 2. DO you perceive yourself that way? 3. How do you believe others perceive you? 4. What are your views of the various definitions and understandings of “disability” that you encounter in your social interactions? A. would you change these understandings? If so, how?   d. Throughout the article there are various anecdotes given by the students in response to the questions asked in the experiment. Examples of some of the anecdotes are i. “R: I don’t know I definitely think that there should be more done in terms of awareness, but . . . it’s almost like if you were taking courses then you would learn more, that’s sort of . . . that’s sort of your path anyway, you’re going to be naturally more aware. I: Yeah. Mhmm. R: Whereas people who are more, I guess you could say, discriminatory or less . . . understanding . . . are naturally in a path where they’re not going to be exposed to that. I: Right. R: So maybe more interdis- ciplinary approaches to courses, like . . . the whole environment thing like if we put a whole segment on marginalized or disabled populations who may, you know, be more impacted by the environment or energy . . . . I: Mhmm. R: Into a course where the students are going to be going into the discourse, like . . . just like that you’re spreading awareness. And it’s . . . and then with more of that it becomes less and less about spreading awareness and more about general . . . pub- lic, you know. I: Yeah, it‘s maybe less of an odd thing that we’re trying to insert. R: Yeah. Because I don’t think it should be like a special thing . . . like it shouldn’ t be like “okay everyone we’ re going to take 15 minutes to talk about you know . . . being accepting of other people, or whatever.’ I: Yeah. R: It should just be, like . . . part of it. (P 002) ii. I think when people are uncomfortable around me (laughs) . . . it’s a funny case of dual disability. It’s like . . . they’re seeing a disability, but then they become disabled by that disability . . . and they don’t know how to act, and they are uncomfortable. It’s not . . . well then sure it might translate into me being uncom- fortable . . . but let’s face it if they are uncomfortable, they are the ones that have some sort of impairment and they are not able to deal with . . . whatever they’re having trouble with. (P 003)
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