point reads And nothing gainst Times scythe can make defense Save breed to

Point reads and nothing gainst times scythe can make

This preview shows page 6 - 8 out of 8 pages.

point reads, “And nothing ‘gainst Time’s scythe can make defense / Save breed,  to brave him when he takes thee hence.” (170, 13-4). Spenserian Sonnet:  A sonnet that follows the rhyme scheme of  ABA BB CB CC DCD/EE.  This style is similar to Shakespearean in that there are  three quatrains, but the 2 bolded couplet links in the middle of the sonnet are  what sets this type apart from the others. Spondee:  A specific type of foot that consists of   2 stressed beats one right after  another. Example: “But O the heavy change, now thou art gone, / Now thou art  gone, and never must return!” (37) The foot, “now thou art gone” in the poem  “Lycidas” by John Milton is an example of a spondee. Stanza:  Several lines of poetry that make up a paragraph within a poem.  Stanzas can contain as many lines as the poet wishes to make them, but they  typically contain meter and have a rhyme scheme. Example:  “If they be two, they are two so As stiff twin compasses are two; Thy soul, the fixed foot, makes no show To move, but doth, if th’ other do.” (199, 25-8) This is an example of a stanza from the poem “A Valediction Forbidding  Mourning” by John Donne and is made up of four lines, as well as all of the  stanzas in the poem. Trochee:  1 stressed beat followed by one unstressed beat. Example: The line, “Frequent, some stream obscure, some uncouth name”  (181, 31) in “Eighteen Hundred and Eleven” by Anna Barbauld is an example of a 
trochee.  The stressed beats really stand out and give the sharp tone to the line,  which is what Barbauld planned to do. Verse Paragraph:  A type of stanza that can be as long or short as the poet  would like, and it doesn’t typically have a rhyme scheme. Example:  “I believe in you my soul… the other I am must not abase itself  to you, / And you must not be abased to the other.” (32, 73-4) is a verse  paragraph from Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself”.  This verse paragraph is very  short as it is only two lines, but others in the same poem are several lines long  with lines of all different lengths. Volta:  The Italian word for lightening bolt that represents a dramatic and major  shift in a sonnet, usually occurring at line 9. Example: The first sonnet in the “Sonnets from the Portuguese” (593) by  Elizabeth Barrett Browning has a volta that comes in the middle of line 9.  “Straightway I was ‘ware, / So weeping, how a mystic Shape did move” (9-10).  She purposely makes her volta spill over into the next line to show how the  misery in her sonnet is never ending.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture