Fraudulent schemes such as investment scams or phony collections for charity

Fraudulent schemes such as investment scams or phony

This preview shows page 48 - 49 out of 53 pages.

Fraudulent schemes, such as investment scams or phony collections for charity, have also multiplied in recent years. Internet fraud , including identity theft and financial scams, has become a serious problem. One common form of Internet fraud is phishing , a type of identity theft that uses deceptive emails and fraudulent online sites to fool users into divulging their personal data. Many consumers also worry about online and digital security . Another Internet marketing concern is that of access by vulnerable or unauthorized groups . Invasion of privacy is perhaps the toughest public policy issue now confronting the direct marketing industry. Consumers often benefit from database marketing; they receive more offers that are closely matched to their interests. However, many critics worry that marketers may know too much about consumers’ lives and that they may use this knowledge to take unfair advantage of consumers. In response to these concerns, the Canadian government passed the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) in 2001. It came into full force in 2004. The act is based on four key principles: CONSUMER KNOWLEDGE AND CONSENT. Consumers must know that information about them is being gathered and they must provide consent before firms can collect, use, or disclose consumers’ personal information. LIMITATIONS. Firms can only collect and use information appropriate to the transaction being undertaken. For example, if a firm needs to mail you something, it can ask for your home address, but it may not request additional information unrelated to this task. ACCURACY. Firms must be sure that the information they gather is recorded accurately. Firms must appoint a privacy officer to be responsible for this task. RIGHT TO ACCESS. Finally, individuals have the right to know what information is being held about them. They can also demand that errors in their personal information be corrected, and they may request that their personal information be withdrawn from a firm’s database. Lesson 14: The Global Marketplace Lesson objectives: List the six major decisions firms face when going international (585-587) Describe how the international trade system- as well as global economic, cultural, and other environments- affected an organizations international marketing decision (587-594) Identify critical issues to consider before going international and selecting an international market (594-596) Outline the 3 main approaches to entering international markets (596-599) Describe how firms adapt their marketing programs for international markets (599-608) Identify how companies organize for global marketing (608-609) LO1 The world is shrinking rapidly with the arrival of faster digital communication, transportation, and financial flows. Products developed in one country have found enthusiastic acceptance in other countries. International trade has boomed over the past three decades.
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