SensorMedics 3 NON INVASIVE VENTILATOR MODES Non invasive ventilation modes are

Sensormedics 3 non invasive ventilator modes non

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SensorMedics 3 NON-INVASIVE VENTILATOR MODESNon-invasive ventilation modes are used for patients who are able to breathe spontaneously but who may have restrictive and/or obstructive lung disorders or who are in respiratory failure wherehypoxia and/or CO2retention is documented. Many patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea 03/25/1910Figure 3: SensorMedics 3100BPed/Adult High FrequencyOscillatory Ventilator
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(OSA), COPD and Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome (OHS) utilize this mode of ventilation at home. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Can be used non-invasively by nasal or facemask; or invasively by ETT or trach. A pre-set level of pressure is present throughout inspiration and expiration which holds the alveoli openin order to improve gas exchange. The patient must be able to breathe spontaneously. CPAP may be used for sleep apnea or for acute hypoxia but is generally not effective to treat hypercarbia (elevated CO2)Settings: FiO2& CPAP BiLevel Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) A non-invasive way of delivering pressure support (PS) and PEEP to a patient by mask, nasalpillows, or nose mask. BiPAP may be used to treat both hypoxia and hypercarbia Settings: FiO2, IPAP (inspiratory peak airway pressure) & EPAP (expiratory peak airway pressure) Advantages of Non-invasive ventilator modes: Helpful in patients with COPD, CHF and immunocompromised and may help avoid invasive ventilationDisadvantages of Non-invasive ventilator modes: Should not be used in obtunded patients or patients with excessive secretions. Patient is at risk for aspiration. May reduce cardiac output in some patients. Masks may not fit and leak. Patient may remove mask frequentlyFigure 4: Nasal Mask for Non-Invasive BiPAP or CPAPSECONDARY CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONSThere are a number of secondary controls that are adjusted ONLY by the Respiratory 03/25/1911
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Therapist after the main ventilator settings have been determined; some are briefly described below...DEFINITIONS:Nebulizer Control- Various medications (usually bronchodilators) can be put into a nebulizer cup that is incorporated into the ventilator circuit. When the nebulizer control is turned on, some of this medication is nebulized or turned into an aerosol with each machine-delivered breath. A few ml’s of normal saline are added to the medication as a diluent.Peak Flow-This control determines how fast the preset tidal volume is delivered into the patient’s lungs; in other words, how long inspiration lasts. The therapist adjusts this according to the respiratory rate; the patient’s breathing efforts, and the nature of the patient’s lung problem and various other factors.Sensitivity-This control determines how ”sensitive” the ventilator is to the patient’s breathing efforts. The lower the sensitivity (i.e., 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, etc.), the easier it is for the patient to “trigger” the ventilator in the assist/control mode.
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