The Acceptance Test Plan should be reviewed by The Business Unit Manager Those

The acceptance test plan should be reviewed by the

This preview shows page 36 - 40 out of 96 pages.

The Acceptance Test Plan should be reviewed by: The Business Unit Manager; Those with key responsibilities in the Test Plan – the Acceptance Test participants should be offered the opportunity to review and comment. It will help them understand the nature of their involvement and allow them to voice any concerns;
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The Acceptance Testing Kit – Part 2 24 The Service Provider – this may be a contractual requirement (if it is not, allowing them to review the Plan will clarify any issues they may have). They should understand end-user expectations for the system and the support (if any) they are required to provide; Any other key stakeholders; and An independent quality inspector - they may pick up items that seem obvious to the author and participants, but may be open to misinterpretation.
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The Acceptance Testing Kit – Part 2 25 Phase 3 Execution and Control Preparing to Conduct the Acceptance Test If the Acceptance Test Manager takes on responsibility for scheduling and assigning Testing tasks e.g. assigning individual Test Scripts to team members, workflow will run more smoothly and efficiently. Try and avoid any individual member of the Testing team shouldering too great a workload. It will also help in tracking work progress as sometimes, when people from different Business Units are involved, the same Test Script may require running by more than one Tester. The Acceptance Test Manager should ensure that each participant understands their assignment, is aware of the Test procedures, and knows the timetable expectations for each task. By previewing the Test Script and individual Tests, a tester can clarify any concerns with the Acceptance Test Manger before undertaking a Test Script. What You Need Before You Start Testing Ideally, Acceptance Testing should run according to the Acceptance Test Plan from start to finish without disruption and without the need to change either the system or the Testing environment. In reality, things do go wrong, and continuity is often difficult to achieve. To minimise the likelihood of disruption, Acceptance Testing should only proceed if the following have occurred: 1. The Acceptance Test Plan, including all Acceptance Criteria, has been signed-off by the Business Unit Manager; 2. There has been formal management approval to proceed with Acceptance Testing; 3. Test Data has been made available; 4. The Acceptance Test environment has been established, stabilised, and protected against unauthorised or inadvertent change; 5. The system has been thoroughly system-tested by the suppliers or developers, the system test has been formally signed-off, and the system (including all documentation) formally handed over for Acceptance; and 6. Testing participants have received the necessary training for using the system and for following Test procedures.
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The Acceptance Testing Kit – Part 2 26 A Test Log helps when problems arise with the test system or test data. If you know precisely what took place prior to the problem, the Log can be referenced to prevent the problem recurring.
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  • Fall '18
  • acceptance testing, Acceptance Test Manager

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