Industrial union a labour union whose member are linked by their work in a

Industrial union a labour union whose member are

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Industrial union – a labour union whose member are linked by their work in a particular industry. Typically, an industrial union represents many different occupations. Membership in the union is the result of working for a particular employer in the industry. Changing employers is less common than it is among craft workers, and employees, who change employers remain members of the same union only if they happen to move to other employers covered by that union Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) – a union federation that serves as an umbrella organization for dozens of affiliated Canadian and international unions, as well as provincial federations of labour and regional labour councils.
- Most national unions consists of multiple local units. Negotiation occurs at the local level for work rules and other issues locally determined. In addition, administration of the agreement largely takes place at the local union level. Most day to day interaction between labour and management involves the local union. Individual members participate in local unions in various ways. At meetings of the local union, they elect officials and vote on resolutions to strike. Most of workers’ contact is with the union steward – an employee elected by union members to represent them in ensuring that the terms of the agreement are enforced. - On average, unionized workers receive higher pay than their nonunionized counterparts, and the pressure is greater because of international competition. - Unions have made strategic decisions in recent years to organize the growing private-service sector. This sector includes workers employed in hotels, home care agencies, and offices. Often, these employees are women. This extension of union activity into the service sector has been one reason for the most significant transformation in union membership, that is, the mix of men and women, 2.In what ways do employers and unions exert their power? -The overall decline in union membership has been attributed to several factors. The factor cited most often seems to be change in the structure of the economy. Much recent job growth has occurred among women and youth in the service sector of the economy, while union strength has traditionally been among urban blue-collar workers, especially middle-aged workers-Another force working against union membership is management efforts against union organization. In a survey, almost half of large employers said their most important labour goal was to be union free. Efforts to control costs have contributed to employer resistance to unions-Goals of management (pg. 252)Are to increase the organization’s profits and/or increase productivity. Managers tend to prefer options that lower costs and raise outputWhen deciding whether to discourage employees from forming a union, a concern is that a union will create higher costs in wages and benefits, as well as raise the risk of work stoppages. Managers may also fear that a union will make managers and workers into adversaries or limit management’s discretion in making business and employment decisions When an employer has recognized a union, management’s goals continue to emphasize restraining costs and improving output. Managers continue to prefer to keep the organization’s operations flexible, so they can adjust activities to meet competitive challenges and customer demands. Therefore, in their labour relations, managers prefer to limit increases in wages and benefits and to retain as much control as they can over work rules and schedules-Goals of unionsIn general, unions have the goals of obtaining pay, job security, and working conditions that satisfy their members and of giving members a voice in decisions that affect them. Traditionally, they obtain these goals by gaining power in numbers. The more workers who belong to a union, the greater the union’s power. More members translates into greater ability to halt or disrupt operations. Larger unions also have greater financial resources for continuing a strike.

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