How Serosorting Managing transmission risk Healthy coping strategies are

How serosorting managing transmission risk healthy

This preview shows page 39 - 57 out of 122 pages.

How? Serosorting Managing transmission risk Healthy coping strategies are critical
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HIV & Couples Couples HIV Counseling & Testing (CHCT)
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Prevention Negotiated Safety for couples who decide NOT to use condoms. 1. BOTH partners get tested for HIV 2. Neither partner engages in any unprotected sex during the window period 3. BOTH partners get tested again 3 months later. 4. If BOTH are still HIV-negative, they might forego condoms BUT Partners MUST discuss the “rules”: Monogamy? What if someone cheats and is unsafe? What do we do?
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Health Behaviors for Safer Sex Consistent condom use Limiting sexual behaviors Having conversations about safety Getting tested regularly So how do we encourage people?
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Health Belief Model
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Health Belief Model
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Prevention Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) If exposed to HIV, you can be given HIV meds to take FOR ONE MONTH Available at Emergency Departments in hospitals Treatment must start within 48-72 hours of exposure
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PrEP Pre-exposure Prophylaxis
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Sex Education
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Sex Education
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Sex Education
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Sex Education
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Sex Education
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Sexuality Education Sexuality education is a lifelong process The Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) h as developed the Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality Education () Developmental levels addressed by SIECUS Early childhood Pre-adolescence Early adolescence Adolescence
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Sexuality Education Main topics addressed by SIECUS Human development Relationships Personal skills Sexual behavior Sexual health Society and culture Sexuality education considered one of the most important preventive means
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Sexuality Education Comprehensive: K-12 programs that include information on a broad range of sexuality topics including sexual orientation, contraceptive use, and STD prevention Abstinence-based: Programs that emphasize the benefits of abstinence, and include information on contraception and STD prevention Abstinence-only: Emphasize abstinence and do not discuss contraception or disease prevention methods Abstinence-only-until-marriage: Abstinence-only programs that promote marriage as the only morally correct context for sexual activity Comprehensive sexuality education delays sex and teens are more likely to use condoms when they do have sex compared to the rest.
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Effective Sexuality Education Programs Characteristics of effective programs: A focus on reducing risky behaviors A basis in proven theoretical approaches A strong, clear stance on risky behavior Providing accurate information about risks and methods Addressing social pressures Helping participants personalize course content Characteristics of ineffective programs: Fear-based messages Misinformation that teens can challenge when checking other sources
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Communication with Children & Adolescents Content is not the only factor. Also important are:
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  • Spring '14
  • Anderson,Stephanie
  • Human Sexuality, Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior

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