Instead of waiting for a job opening HR managers are studying their firms

Instead of waiting for a job opening hr managers are

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strategic imperative and, therefore, an ongoing process. Instead of waiting for a job opening, HR managers are studying their firms’ strategies in conjunction with their organizational charts, job analysis information, and external factors such as the labour market and the competition and then recruiting proactively and continually. The greater competition for talent means that recruiting has become more important for managers. Selection:
The process of choosing individuals who have relevant qualifications to fill existing or projected job openings in broad terms that the overall goal of selection is to maximize “hits” and avoid “misses.” Hits are accurate predictions, and misses are inaccurate ones. Job specifications, in particular, help identify the individual competencies employees need for success—the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other factors (KSAOs) that lead to superior performance. Managers then use selection methods such as interviews, references, and preemployment tests to measure applicant KSAOs against the competencies required for the job. Complete and clear specification of required competencies helps interviewers differentiate between qualified and unqualified applicants and reduces the effect of an interviewer’s biases and prejudices. Research also shows that applicants whose KSAOs are well matched to the jobs they are hired for perform better and are more satisfied. The number of steps in the selection process and their sequence will vary not only with the organization but also with the type and level of jobs to be filled. Each step should be evaluated in terms of its contribution to the process. The steps that typically make up the selection process below, not all applicants will complete all steps: Once a pool of applicants has been generated, (This is recruitment) an organization must decide whom to hire, there are many ways to determine which candidate is best suited for the job. (this is selection.)
Unit 4 – 3 What constraints do organizations face in the ways in which they select employees? Due to resource and time constraints, even large organizations typically screen résumés against the qualifications in the job ad, generate a short list, interview, perhaps check references, and then make a job offer. Small organizations or organizations where work is short-term may adopt even more abbreviated selection practices (e.g., “how about we try this for a week and see how you do?”). o This divergence of theory and practice in selection may reflect a cost-benefit analysis by employers. Although a bad hiring decision can be expensive for an organization, that risk is largely notional: It may not happen, and a more elaborate hiring process may not prevented it. The potential expense of a poor hire must be traded off against the immediate need to hire enough workers (often in a hurry) to complete work at the lowest recruitment cost possible.

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