Moreover there is a tendency for the public to make

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Moreover, there is a tendency for the public to make allowances for the intentions andcircumstances of child abusers, at least in less severe or obvious cases or where theactions in question are socially sanctioned. However, there are also many professionsinvolved in prevention or remediation of child abuse or in the implementation of policieson children generally. Medicine, law, education, and the social services are especiallyrelevant here. Professionals in these areas could be expected by virtue of their trainingand experience to bring to their grasp of abuse issues a dimension that transcends culturalvariation. Evidence from the literature and from two Singapore studies is used to explorethe possibility that many professionals may retain attitudes about child maltreatment thatreflect their culture rather than any transcultural agreement on children’s rights generallyor child abuse specifically. If true, changing professional attitudes should be an importantpriority.
71Crosson-Tower, Cynthia.When Children Are Abused: An Educator’s Guide to Intervention.Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, Allyn and Bacon, 2001. This is an invaluable resourcefor educators who are concerned about how to recognize and intervene effectively insituations of child abuse and neglect. It outlines symptoms, provides checklists for quickreference, and describes factors that put children at increased risk of maltreatment. Thebook then takes readers through the step-by-step process of reporting abuse and neglect,describes potential outcomes, and discusses assistance to parents and children that canbe offered by educators. Dr. Crosson-Tower also describes how schools can createchild protection teams to enable all staff to manage abuse and neglect situations moreeffectively. This book will be essential to novice as well as expert educators who needeasy-to-apply information in this difficult area.Daro, Deborah and Anne Cohn Donnelly. “Charting the Waves of Prevention: Two StepsForward, One Step Back,”Child Abuse & Neglect 26, no. 6–7 (Jun 2002): 731–742.Over the past 30 years, the political response to child maltreatment and its preventionin the U.S. has experienced periods of frantic activity, often followed by long periodsof neglect. These “waves” of apparent progress are often minimized by an inability tosustain political commitment to a given reform or course of action. This pattern mayreflect deep differences among child welfare advocates, researchers, and practitioners onhow best to proceed. While most everyone agrees that childhood should not hurt, howto prevent this hurt and at what cost is less clear. To address this dilemma, preventionadvocates, researchers, and practitioners have struggled with conceptual frameworksand programmatic reforms. This article summarizes the relative gains and limitationsof three such efforts and outlines the lessons these efforts offer those formulating futureprevention policies and programs. Such efforts need to avoid the most common mistakes

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