After every 15 compressions give two rescue breaths

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After every 15 compressions, give two rescue breaths. Complete four continuous cycles (just over 1 minute) of CPR, then check for signs of circulation. Continue CPR, checking for signs of circulation every few minutes. If the victim begins to respond, stop chest compressions. If the victim coughs or moves but is still not breathing, give one rescue breath every 5 seconds until help arrives. If the victim begins breathing normally, turn the victim onto his or her side and wait for professional medical help. HS_HEALTH_U09_C28_L2 12/8/03 6:03 PM Page 744
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745 Lesson 2 CPR and First Aid for Shock and Choking Should Schools Require Teens to Take a CPR Course? Heart attacks are the most common medical emergencies in the United States. Many deaths could be prevented, however, by people performing CPR. As a result, organizations such as the American Heart Association and the American Red Cross have certified thousands of people in CPR. To increase the number of trained rescuers, many people think CPR certification should be a high-school graduation requirement. Others disagree. Here are two points of view. Viewpoint 1: Michael P., age 15 I don’t think that all high-school students should be required to take a CPR course. It should be a personal choice. Health courses need to focus more on risk behaviors that affect young people, such as using tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs. Teens who want CPR training can go to their local chapter of the Red Cross or American Heart Association. Viewpoint 2: Sydney J., age 15 Every year in the United States, 350,000 people die of sudden heart attacks. Many of these people could be saved if CPR were administered. It makes sense that the more people who are trained in CPR, the fewer people who may die. Many of these courses are taught by teachers who instruct students in the use of AEDs as well as in oxygen administration. Both of these technologies have improved the survival rates of heart attack victims. 1. Should high schools require teens to take a CPR course? Why or why not? 2. CPR training “obligates” people to use their skills when they witness an emergency situation. How well do you think teens could handle this responsibility? A C T I V I T I E S CPR for Infants and Children Infants and children in life-threatening emergencies aren’t treated in exactly the same way that adults are. For example, you shouldn’t use an AED on an infant or a child. Likewise, you can’t use the same amount of force in chest compressions. Figures 28.5 and 28.6 on the next page show how to perform CPR on infants and children. These steps were developed by the American Heart Association. For an infant or a child, provide about one minute of CPR before calling 911 for help. HS_HEALTH_U09_C28_L2 12/8/03 6:03 PM Page 745
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746 Chapter 28 First Aid and Emergencies T HE ABC S OF I NFANT AND C HILD CPR Airway. Look inside the victim’s mouth. Remove anything you see blocking the airway. If you don’t suspect head or neck A injuries, lay the victim flat on a firm surface. Gently tilt the head
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