How did the study support Ms Campbells case This study supports Ms Campbells

How did the study support ms campbells case this

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How did the study support Ms. Campbell’s case?: This study supports Ms. Campbell’s case as it provides another possible cause to cervicitis if the condition persists after treatment for gonorrhea.
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Evidenced-Based Article III Title, author(s), and year of article: Cervicitis: A prospective observational study of empiric azithromycin treatment in women with cervicitis and non-specific cervicitis. Josephine Lusk, Frances L Garden, Robert G Cumming, William D Rawlinson, Zin W Naing, Pam Konecny. 2016. Brief summary/purpose of the study: This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of azithromycin when used empirically when treating cervicitis. This was a trial study with the participants divided into two groups. Cervicitis group 1 had 116 participants and cervicitis group 2 had 96 participants. Those in cervicitis group 1 consisted of women with STD infection but excluded those with trichomoniasis and those in cervicitis group 2 had the additional exclusion of gonorrhea, chlamydia, and mycoplasma. PCR was used to identify trichomoniasis, chlamydia, and mycoplasma while a culture was used to identify gonorrhea. It was found that empirical use of one gram of azithromycin was effective in treating less than 25% of cervicitis group 2 participants and not effective on those in cervicitis group 2. Empirical treatment of cervicitis is effective in specific cervicitis has no benefit with non-specific cervicitis. How did the study support Ms. Campbell’s case?: This study supports Ms. Campbell’s case as it shows that azithromycin should can be used in her treatment. While the study notes it is primarily effective against chlamydia and mycoplasma, chlamydia is known to have gonorrhea as a coinfection. Ms. Campbell has gonorrhea as evidenced by culture.
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Evidenced-Based Article IV Title, author(s), and year of article: Management of Gonorrhea in Adolescents and Adults in the United States. Sarah Kidd and Kimberly A. Workowski. 2015. Brief summary/purpose of the study: This study discusses the reported cases of gonorrhea in the US in adolescences and adults. The study utilized a STD Treatment and Guidelines Expert Consultation meeting, which was hosted by the CDC, to discuss recent developments in prevention and treatment of gonorrhea, and other STDs. Nine key questions were presented to the experts ranging from first line antibiotic changes to medication regimens with allergies to first line antibiotics to current recommendations of testing and treatment. It was determined there should be no changes to the first line antibiotic regimen of 250 mg IM ceftriaxone and 1 g PO azithromycin for the treatment of gonorrhea. The study does list all antibiotics that can be used with their associated effectiveness. It was determined that there should be a change to the recommended alternative first-line treatment of gonorrhea to be a dual regimen of 320 mg PO gemifloxacin and 2 g PO azithromycin, both give as a single dose, or a one-time dose of 240 mg IM gentamicin and 2 g PO azithromycin. The study also recommends this alternative dual regimen for treatment of gonorrhea when a cephalosporin allergy is present. The
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